<div dir="ltr">I think we both agree on that point, Richard. Doesn&#39;t it follow, then, that when there is considerable distance from an originary social context (say, between Milton&#39;s time and our own?) that the possibility for misunderstanding rises considerably? There&#39;s the added complexity of a fictional social context guiding <i>Paradise Lost </i>on top of that (even if you believe in a real Adam and Eve and Garden of Eden, you can&#39;t believe Milton was describing the real thing), and the fact that he&#39;s engaged in more complex utterances than &quot;pass the salt.&quot; <div><br></div><div>The problem I see is not with saying that the meaning of &quot;pass the salt&quot; is perfectly obvious to a social insider, but with making a similar claim of the obvious for <i>PL</i> or any of the sonnets. <br><div><br></div><div>Jim R</div></div></div>