<div dir="ltr">Landscape: The blurb by Lawrence Mathis (poet-architect) for my new poetry book, Palamedes: The Lost Muse of Justice, reads as follows: &quot;With these poems Anderson has again shown that in capable hands the mythic landscape, the deep stuff of humanity, is ever relevant, ever fresh, and ever telling of our common nature.&quot;  <div>Interesting use of word....&quot;mythic landscape&quot; and &quot;nature.&quot;   Peace, Kemmer Anderson</div></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Thu, Aug 25, 2016 at 5:04 PM, Gregory Machacek <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:Gregory.Machacek@marist.edu" target="_blank">Gregory.Machacek@marist.edu</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><font face="Default Sans Serif,Verdana,Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif" size="2"><div>Moreover, the OED has no earlier witness for the word landscape meaning &quot;<span style="font-family:Georgia,Times,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;font-size:1.231em;line-height:1.35"><font color="#333333">A view or prospect of natural inland scenery, such as can be taken in at a glance from one point of view; a piece of country scenery.&quot;  All earlier uses have the meaning &quot;</font></span><span style="font-family:Georgia,Times,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;font-size:1.231em;line-height:1.35"><font color="#333333">A picture representing natural inland scenery, as distinguished from a sea picture, a portrait, etc.&quot;</font></span></div><div><span style="font-family:Georgia,Times,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;font-size:1.231em;line-height:1.35"><font color="#333333"><br></font></span></div><div><span style="font-family:Georgia,Times,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;font-size:1.231em;line-height:1.35"><font color="#333333">I think Milton&#39;s use in L&#39;Allegro might have been as startlingly poetic to the poem&#39;s early readers as if one were to say &quot;All the portraits that met at the cocktail party last night&quot; i.e. using a term for a category of artistic production for the kind of subject matter represented in those artworks.</font></span></div><div><span style="font-family:Georgia,Times,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;font-size:1.231em;line-height:1.35"><font color="#333333"><br></font></span></div><div><span style="font-family:Georgia,Times,&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;font-size:1.231em;line-height:1.35"><font color="#333333">Be well,</font></span><br><br>Greg Machacek<br>Professor of English<br>Marist College</div><br><br><font color="#990099">-----<a href="mailto:milton-l-bounces@richmond.edu" target="_blank">milton-l-bounces@<wbr>richmond.edu</a> wrote: -----</font><div style="padding-left:5px"><div style="padding-right:0px;padding-left:5px;border-left:solid black 2px">To: John Milton Discussion List &lt;<a href="mailto:milton-l@lists.richmond.edu" target="_blank">milton-l@lists.richmond.edu</a>&gt;<br>From: Nancy Charlton <u></u><br>Sent by: <a href="mailto:milton-l-bounces@richmond.edu" target="_blank">milton-l-bounces@richmond.edu</a><br>Date: 08/19/2016 02:21PM<span class=""><br>Subject: [Milton-L] Land skipping<br><br>This is the title of a new study by Anna Pavord of British landscapes. She uses the old form of the word, noting its use by JM:<div><br></div><div>&quot;<span></span><font size="2"><span>The word “landskip,” no longer in general use, survives as a British regionalism (and is allowed in Scrabble). It first appeared as “landschap,” a Dutch import, with colloquial English shaping “schap” to “skip.” John Milton used it in “L’Allegro” in 1645: “Straight mine eye hath caught new pleasures / Whilst the landskip round it measures. . . .”</span></font></div><div><font size="2"><span><br></span></font></div><div><a href="http://mobile.nytimes.com/2016/08/21/books/review/landskipping-anna-pavord.html?emc=edit_tnt_20160819&amp;nlid=25711871&amp;tntemail0=y&amp;referer=" target="_blank">http://mobile.nytimes.com/<wbr>2016/08/21/books/review/<wbr>landskipping-anna-pavord.html?<wbr>emc=edit_tnt_20160819&amp;nlid=<wbr>25711871&amp;tntemail0=y&amp;referer=</a><font size="2"><span><br></span></font></div><div><br></div><div>I hope my phone copied the whole title. If not, my apologies if I must send you to the NYT site. </div><div><br></div><div>Stay cool and dry!</div><div><br></div><div>Nancy Charlton </div>
<div><font face="Courier New,Courier,monospace" size="3">______________________________<wbr>_________________<br>Milton-L mailing list<br><a href="mailto:Milton-L@richmond.edu" target="_blank">Milton-L@richmond.edu</a><br>Manage your list membership and access list archives at <a href="https://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l" target="_blank">https://lists.richmond.edu/<wbr>mailman/listinfo/milton-l</a><br><br>Milton-L web site: <a href="http://johnmilton.org/" target="_blank">http://johnmilton.org/</a></font></div><u></u></span></div></div><div></div></font>
<br>______________________________<wbr>_________________<br>
Milton-L mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Milton-L@richmond.edu">Milton-L@richmond.edu</a><br>
Manage your list membership and access list archives at <a href="https://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">https://lists.richmond.edu/<wbr>mailman/listinfo/milton-l</a><br>
<br>
Milton-L web site: <a href="http://johnmilton.org/" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">http://johnmilton.org/</a><br></blockquote></div><br></div>