<font face="Default Sans Serif,Verdana,Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif" size="2"><p class="MsoNormal">Ok, several admirers have now weighed in with emphatic and in some cases detailed praise of ďMethought I saw.Ē<span style="font-size: 12.8px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal">Itís now my burden to put more fully than I so far have the case for sonnet 23 being considered a poor sonnet.&nbsp; Sad task.&nbsp; First, thereís little likelihood that I will actually manage to dislodge such ardent and settled affection.&nbsp; And say I were to succeed; what would have succeed <i>in</i> but stripping some dear colleague of the joy he or she takes in this sonnet?</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Still, Johnson meant <i>something</i> when he unhesitatingly and categorically, indeed almost nonchalantly, labeled the poem poor.&nbsp; And I feel I have some sense what he might have meant. &nbsp;So here goes.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Iím going to work outward from what Iíve called the rhythmic dud of line 6. &nbsp;It <i>is</i> a dud.&nbsp; You just have to listen to Richardsonís beautiful recital to hear how rhythmicality, sustained otherwise throughout the entirety of the sonnet, falters as it hits the vacuity of that over-rapid succession of syllables, ďPurification in,Ē that a voicer <i>just canít do anything with</i>.<span style="font-size: 12.8px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal">Itís not incorrect whatís been said several times: that both an initial trochee and a pyrrhic spondee are &nbsp;common deviations within the pentameter.&nbsp; I think ďLaurel and myrtle and what higher grewĒ could probably be marked with the same scansion as this line.&nbsp; Then whatís the problem here?&nbsp; Itís the five-syllable word. &nbsp;I know we generally ignore word boundaries when we scan, but words longer four syllables assert themselves on the rhythm in ways that shorter words donít.&nbsp; Here ďpurificationĒ has to hurry its syllables along to keep itself together as a word.&nbsp; No, not every line has to sing; but this one gasps. &nbsp;/xx/x is a poor line opening when it is one word.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Will Miltonís own practice elsewhere convince you?&nbsp; In the 10,000+ lines of PL, he only once has a five-syllable word with this /xx/x pattern of accentuation at the opening of a line.&nbsp; And thatís not due simply to the rarity of five-syllable words in general, for we have abominations irreconcilable, inexorably, deliberation, illimitable, uninterrupted, insuperable, insinuating, inseparably and half a dozen others. &nbsp;No, itís because he knows in general to stay away from /xx/x five-syllable words. Moreover, in the single case where he does use an /xx/x word (Justification towards God and peace), he more decisively returns to iambicity with the sixth syllable than he does in ďPurification . . .Ē (when itís a disyllable, <i>towards</i> is for Milton stressed on the first syllable).</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Milton knows better than to do what he does in line 6 of Sonnet 23.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">--All right, for heavenís sakes, the first half of line 6 of sonnet 23, is not, prosodically speaking, Miltonís finest second (the flaw youíre highlighting lasts literally one second, Machacek!).&nbsp;&nbsp;So what?*</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Well, this is getting long and itís getting late, so the ďso whatĒ will have to wait.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">*Sorry to speak on yíallís behalf.&nbsp; Do feel free to tell me if you donít granít me even as much as Iíve argued for here.<o:p></o:p></p><br><br><br>Greg Machacek<br>Professor of English<br>Marist College<div></div></font>