<div dir="ltr"><font color="#000000" face="Times New Roman" size="3">

</font><p style="margin:0in 0in 10pt"><b><font color="#000000" face="Calibri" size="3">From where I sit,
Sonnet 23 has the kind of charged subtlety, paradox, and pathos we expect in a great
sonnet. Take a second look at the dream report.</font></b></p><font color="#000000" face="Times New Roman" size="3">

</font><p style="margin:0in 0in 10pt 0.5in"><b><span style="line-height:115%;font-size:10pt"><font color="#000000" face="Calibri">Milton seems to see his
sainted wife, brought back to him from the dead as Alcestis was brought back to
Admetus. <i>His</i> wife (&quot;Mine&quot;),
unlike Admetus&#39;s, is as pure as a mother purged of childbed taint under the Old
Ritual Law. It&#39;s a purity he is confident he will find when he has an
unobstructed view of her in heaven. None the less, in spite of her Alcestis-like veil, the love, sweetness,
and goodness visible in her person are as obvious to his imagination as her face
would be. Unfortunately, at the moment when she leans forward to embrace him,
he awakens, she vanishes, and he is back in a day that might as well be night
for all he can see of it. </font></span></b></p><font color="#000000" face="Times New Roman" size="3">

</font><p style="margin:0in 0in 10pt"><b><font color="#000000" face="Calibri" size="3">It seems clear that,
if anything, childbed taint is not the threat to &quot;purity&quot; that the
dreamer should be worrying about. At the end of Euripides&#39; play, Heracles warns
Admetus not to touch his wife, newly released by Thanatos, for three days. The
Old Law contains similar warnings; compare Jesus&#39;s <i>noli me tangere</i> <span> </span>to Mary
Magdalene (John 20:17). <span> </span>In short, the
dreamer needs to reckon with the taint of mortality--his mortality, not hers. Consider
what she&#39;s trying to do just before she&#39;s interrupted: &quot;enclining&quot;
(leaning in) to embrace him--and doing this with no trace of misgivings about &quot;taint.&quot;</font></b></p><font color="#000000" face="Times New Roman" size="3">

</font><p style="margin:0in 0in 10pt"><b><font color="#000000" face="Calibri" size="3">As for the alleged dissonance
of a trochaic substitution for an iamb followed by a pyrrhic-plus-spondee substitution
for two iambs in &quot;<i>PŪRĬ</i>-fica-<i>TI</i>Ŏ<i>N
</i><span> </span><i>ĬN
TH&#39;ŌLD<span>  </span>LĀW</i> did save,&quot; these are
normal variations in the pentameter; for the pyrrhic-plus-spondee, compare &quot;<i>TŎ HĔR GLĀD HŪS</i>band gave&quot; (line 3).
The emphasis in the allegedly clunky line is telling: the law the speaker would
be better off emphasizing is the law (Galatians 5:14) expressed in his wife&#39;s
last interrupted gesture.</font></b></p><font color="#000000" face="Times New Roman" size="3">

</font><div class="gmail_extra"><br></div></div>