<div dir="ltr">Dear Jeffery,<div><br></div><div>Thanks for raising the question of traditions as to serpents&#39; coloring (and for posting the link to the tapestry). </div><div><br></div><div>Actually we can start with the Hebrew Bible itself, focusing on Numbers 21:6-9, which tells how the Deity sent &quot;fiery serpents&quot; (KJV) to bite people as punishment for speaking &quot;against the Lord.&quot; In response to Moses&#39; prayer, God instructs him to &quot;make a fiery serpent, and set it upon a pole.&quot; Moses &quot;made a serpent of brass&quot; and held it aloft; everyone who had been bitten and looked on the brass serpent was able to live. </div><div><br></div><div>[In Hebrew the above is a play-on-words, since nahash (serpent) and nehoshet (brass in KJV; copper in the Jewish Publication Society translation) come from the same 3-letter root. There&#39;s also a problem understanding saraf - the word translated as fiery. I looked at 2 commentaries on these verses - Rashi and Ramban - but couldn&#39;t get much out of them - my fault; I&#39;m not a biblical scholar.] </div><div><br></div><div>But whichever metal the serpent was made of - brass or copper: both brass and copper, especially when held aloft with the strong desert sun shining on them, would probably have a fiery color which is a combination of red and gold (and fire itself is often pictured by combining red and yellow-gold).</div><div><br></div><div>Hope this helps,</div><div>Nancy</div><div><br></div><div>Dr. Nancy Rosenfeld</div><div>Max Stern College of Jezreel Valley, 19300, Israel</div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div>          </div></div>