<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<HTML><HEAD>
<META content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" http-equiv=Content-Type>
<META name=GENERATOR content="MSHTML 8.00.6001.19400">
<STYLE></STYLE>
</HEAD>
<BODY bgColor=#ffffff>
<DIV><FONT size=2 face=Arial>Dario,</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT size=2 face=Arial>Here's&nbsp;my&nbsp;reply to&nbsp;your question, 
whether the&nbsp;forbidden fruit&nbsp;could have been a peach.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT size=2 face=Arial>Most of us agree that the forbidden fruit is 
essentially ambiguous, and could have been any sort of fruit, "apple" in a 
general sense.&nbsp;The sort of&nbsp;fruit it is is&nbsp;not important for the 
reading of the poem's religious doctrines. Therefore, if that is the 
case,&nbsp;it could be&nbsp;imagined or&nbsp;thought&nbsp;of as possibly a 
peach, since the peach has&nbsp;linguistic and etymological traditions 
associating it with the apple "in a general sense," being a "persicum malum= 
"Persian apple" and&nbsp;has been&nbsp;used in literary tradition over the ages 
with these associations in mind by several authors, as you point out in 
Melville's work. That is all.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT size=2 face=Arial>Salwa</FONT></DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>Salwa Khoddam PhD<BR>Professor of English Emerita<BR>Oklahoma City 
University<BR>Author of *Mythopoeic Narnia:<BR>Memory, Metaphor, and 
Metamorphoses <BR>in The Chronicles of Narnia*<BR><A 
href="mailto:skhoddam@cox.net">skhoddam@cox.net</A></DIV>
<BLOCKQUOTE 
style="BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px">
  <DIV style="FONT: 10pt arial">----- Original Message ----- </DIV>
  <DIV 
  style="FONT: 10pt arial; BACKGROUND: #e4e4e4; font-color: black"><B>From:</B> 
  <A title=Gregory.Machacek@marist.edu 
  href="mailto:Gregory.Machacek@marist.edu">Gregory Machacek</A> </DIV>
  <DIV style="FONT: 10pt arial"><B>To:</B> <A title=milton-l@lists.richmond.edu 
  href="mailto:milton-l@lists.richmond.edu">John Milton Discussion List</A> 
  </DIV>
  <DIV style="FONT: 10pt arial"><B>Sent:</B> Tuesday, April 15, 2014 10:31 
  PM</DIV>
  <DIV style="FONT: 10pt arial"><B>Subject:</B> [Milton-L] fellatious and 
  coarticulation</DIV>
  <DIV><BR></DIV><FONT size=2 
  face="Default Sans Serif,Verdana,Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif">
  <DIV>I can't believe I'm getting sucked into another thread.</DIV>
  <DIV><BR></DIV>
  <DIV>I had resolved to give you all a break from hearing from me after the 
  whole the-fruit's-not-an-apple trudge.</DIV>
  <DIV><BR></DIV>
  <DIV>But in addition to what John Savoie says here, that all a pun needs is a 
  rough similarity, we must remember what he established in his MQ article, and 
  what Salwa shows: &nbsp;English had no word for fellatio evidenced before 
  1887. &nbsp;So if we're going to hear a pun at all it will be through the 
  Latin. &nbsp;I think the e in fellare is a short e, so if "that" nudges 
  "fallacious" toward "fellacious," all we would need to do is start hearing 
  fell-ay and then the "t" part of "ch" to have the pun start to register. 
  &nbsp;"All that fall" is not a valid analog, although on the surface, nothing 
  could seem to be closer. &nbsp;In that phrase, coarticulation would operate 
  through the rhyme. &nbsp;The "all" and "fall" would fix each other in their 
  normal pronunciation, and together they would turn "that" into "th't" 
  &nbsp;("th't" is one of the first words through which I started noticing what 
  I later learned linguists had a name for).</DIV>
  <DIV><BR></DIV>
  <DIV>Please, please remember, though, that I wasn't primarily trying to add 
  evidence for John's article; I'm using this whole case as a pretext for asking 
  a question as to whether a even poet as skilled as Milton could use 
  coarticulation meaningfully, or whether that is too hyper-subtle an aspect of 
  language to be deliberately employed.</DIV>
  <DIV><BR></DIV>
  <DIV>I'm undecided on the pun, but I have this question. &nbsp;Is "fallacious" 
  sufficiently motivated here if not for the pun? &nbsp;In what sense is the 
  fruit fallacious, and why is that the feature of it that one would mention 
  here, as its force is being exhaled?<BR><BR><BR><BR>Greg Machacek<BR>Professor 
  of English<BR>Marist College</DIV><BR><BR><FONT 
  color=#990099>-----milton-l-bounces@lists.richmond.edu wrote: -----</FONT>
  <DIV style="PADDING-LEFT: 5px">
  <DIV 
  style="BORDER-LEFT: black 2px solid; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; PADDING-RIGHT: 0px">To: 
  John Milton Discussion List &lt;milton-l@lists.richmond.edu&gt;, John K 
  Leonard &lt;jleonard@uwo.ca&gt;<BR>From: jsavoie@siue.edu<BR>Sent by: 
  milton-l-bounces@lists.richmond.edu<BR>Date: 04/15/2014 09:54PM<BR>Cc: John 
  Milton Discussion List &lt;milton-l@lists.richmond.edu&gt;<BR>Subject: Re: 
  [Milton-L] lapsarian sex, fallacious, milton's verbal skill (and blake's 
  fruit)<BR><BR>
  <DIV><FONT size=3 face="Courier New,Courier,monospace">A pun need not utilize 
  a precise homophone to be effective; it merely needs to<BR>be close enough to 
  be suggestive.<BR><BR>John Savoie<BR><BR>Quoting John K Leonard 
  &lt;jleonard@uwo.ca&gt;:<BR><BR>&gt;<BR>&gt;<BR>&gt; On 04/15/14, Gregory 
  Machacek &lt;Gregory.Machacek@marist.edu&gt; wrote:<BR>&gt; &gt; &nbsp; On 
  different sides of the fallacious/fellatio debate:<BR>&gt; &gt;<BR>&gt; 
  &gt;<BR>&gt; &gt;<BR>&gt; &gt;<BR>&gt; &nbsp;Greg goes on to &nbsp;offer some 
  ingenious ruminations on the "coarticulation" of<BR>&gt; "that" and "fall" to 
  produce "fell", but to my ears it is the last (not the<BR>&gt; first) syllable 
  of "fallacious" that presents the biggest obstacle to the<BR>&gt; obscene pun 
  that John Savoie has proposed. So far as I am aware, there is not<BR>&gt; (and 
  has never been) an English word "fellatious." If our ears are to be as<BR>&gt; 
  finely attuned as Greg asks them to be, this &nbsp;matters. I remain open 
  to<BR>&gt; persuasion, but I have not yet heard any argument compelling enough 
  to woo me<BR>&gt; from my initial response, which was &nbsp;"I too am 
  sceptical." I recognize that<BR>&gt; Greg was &nbsp;weighing options, not 
  taking a side in "the . . . debate", but the<BR>&gt; "coarticulation" evidence 
  carries little weight with me. My point in quoting<BR>&gt; the Carew poem was 
  not (as Carol Barton seems to infer) &nbsp;that Milton was<BR>&gt; similarly 
  rakish; my point was to refute Richard Strier's claim that &nbsp;"even<BR>&gt; 
  pornographic poetry [was] remarkably genitally oriented." I do not think 
  that<BR>&gt; Milton was a pornographic poet (though he did have a taste for 
  bawdy puns, as<BR>&gt; we know from the prose).<BR>&gt;<BR>&gt; Greg's 
  conjecture (I recognize it was nothing more) that "that" might turn<BR>&gt; 
  "fall" into "fell" encounters another obstacle, it seems to me, in Psalm 
  145:<BR>&gt; "the Lord upholdeth all that fall." This biblical verse gave 
  Beckett the<BR>&gt; title of his radio play All That Fall. Does anyone really 
  hear that as "All<BR>&gt; that Fell"?<BR>&gt;<BR>&gt; John 
  Leonard<BR>&gt;<BR>&gt; &gt;<BR>&gt; &gt;<BR>&gt; 
  &gt;<BR>&gt;<BR><BR><BR><BR>-------------------------------------------------<BR>SIUE 
  Web 
  Mail<BR><BR><BR>_______________________________________________<BR>Milton-L 
  mailing list<BR>Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu<BR>Manage your list membership and 
  access list archives at <A 
  href="http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l">http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l</A><BR><BR>Milton-L 
  web site: <A 
  href="http://johnmilton.org/">http://johnmilton.org/</A><BR></FONT></DIV></DIV></DIV>
  <DIV></DIV></FONT>
  <P>
  <HR>

  <P></P>_______________________________________________<BR>Milton-L mailing 
  list<BR>Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu<BR>Manage your list membership and access 
  list archives at 
  http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l<BR><BR>Milton-L web site: 
  http://johnmilton.org/</BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>