<div dir="ltr">Thanks for responding, Richard.&nbsp;<div><br></div><div>I think you&#39;re right about the trickiness of Milton&#39;s rationale for distinguishing between lending help to human beings and lending help to angels: he does sound like he&#39;s saying that we &quot;deserve&quot; grace more because our sin is less, being the product of a deception rather than outright willfulness. Obviously, if it&#39;s a matter of grace, then there&#39;s no need to reference the severity of sin, which is supposed to be infinitely (qualitatively) exclusive of Divine favor rather than quantitatively. If the quantity of sin mattered, then we can still be saved so long as our sin meter doesn&#39;t go too high -- which is almost what God sounds like he&#39;s saying in bk 3 with these lines. &nbsp;&nbsp;<div>
<br></div><div>I&#39;m wondering if a focus on Satan&#39;s unwillingness or inability to really repent -- that we hear from Satan himself in his private thoughts -- would have solved this dilemma? Milton seems to be throwing everything into the conceptual hat here, including predestination and foreknowledge. Was he trying to represent everyone&#39;s position to keep from alienating anyone on this point, or because all of these ideas seemed viable?<br>
<br>I would like to suggest that since Milton doesn&#39;t appear to be a universalist, when he says that man &quot;shall find grace&quot; he may be referring only to the availability of grace to all human beings and the reception of grace by some human beings. If he were to hold to a strict view of predestination, those seeking and asking for grace are those who have been enabled by God to do so, and the sacrifice of Christ might be a means of that enabling. In the NT, you might see some mechanism like this in Romans: &quot;Faith comes by hearing, and hearing by the word of God.&quot; The act hearing of the message carries with it the capacity to believe in it. &nbsp;</div>
<div><br></div><div>Jim R &nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;</div></div></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Sun, Apr 6, 2014 at 12:07 PM, Richard A. Strier <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:rastrier@uchicago.edu" target="_blank">rastrier@uchicago.edu</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">




<div>
<div style="direction:ltr;font-size:10pt;font-family:Arial">Thanks for the nice discussion, Jim.
<div><br>
</div>
<div>But I think &quot;Die he or justice must&quot; makes no sense given what God says about the rationale -- justice -- of forgiving man but not Satan and company (though the fallen angels were also, it seems to me, not &quot;self-tempted&quot;). &nbsp;And I think what you say about
 giving man the capacity to receive grace is lovely but tricky, and not clearly laid out by Milton. &nbsp;&quot;Shall find grace&quot; is pretty absolute. &nbsp;And, within the poem, the creatures that A and E are shown to be after the Fall look as if they are capable of asking
 for and receiving grace. &nbsp;And they are certainly punished directly -- having to leave Eden, cause the misery of history, etc, etc.<br>
<div><br>
<div style="font-family:Tahoma;font-size:13px">
<div style="font-family:Tahoma;font-size:13px">
<div style="font-family:Tahoma;font-size:13px">RS </div>
</div>
</div>
</div>
<div style="font-size:16px;font-family:Times New Roman">
<hr>
<div style="direction:ltr"><font face="Tahoma" color="#000000"><b>From:</b> <a href="mailto:milton-l-bounces@lists.richmond.edu" target="_blank">milton-l-bounces@lists.richmond.edu</a> [<a href="mailto:milton-l-bounces@lists.richmond.edu" target="_blank">milton-l-bounces@lists.richmond.edu</a>] on behalf of James Rovira [<a href="mailto:jamesrovira@gmail.com" target="_blank">jamesrovira@gmail.com</a>]<br>

<b>Sent:</b> Sunday, April 06, 2014 1:47 AM<div class=""><br>
<b>To:</b> John Milton Discussion List<br>
</div><b>Subject:</b> Re: [Milton-L] crucifixion<br>
</font><br>
</div><div><div class="h5">
<div></div>
<div>
<div dir="ltr">Richard --
<div><br>
</div>
<div>Thanks for posting these ideas. I&#39;d like to suggest that Milton&#39;s specific language is important. He doesn&#39;t have God say, &quot;I&#39;m going to forgive Adam and Eve because they were deceived.&quot; He has God say,</div>

<div><br>
</div>
<div><span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">Self-tempted, self-</span><span title="depraved" style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">deprav&#39;d</span><span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">:&nbsp;</span><a href="http://www.dartmouth.edu/~milton/reading_room/pl/book_3/notes.shtml#falls" style="color:purple;font-family:palatino,times,serif;font-size:16px;text-indent:24px" target="_blank">Man
 falls&nbsp;<span title="deceived">deceiv&#39;d</span></a><span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">&nbsp;[ 130 ]</span><br style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">

<span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">By the other first: Man therefore shall find grace,</span><br>
</div>
<div><span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif"><br>
</span></div>
<div><span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">He says instead that man shall find &quot;grace.&quot; We might be tempted to think of God&#39;s forgiveness the way that we think of human forgiveness: you or I could
 forgive someone unilaterally, regardless of their response to us or of their feelings for us.&nbsp;</span></div>
<div><span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif"><br>
</span></div>
<div><span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">But grace is something that must be both given and received. The Son observes later in Book 3 that</span></div>
<div><span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif"><br>
</span></div>
<div><span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">&quot;</span><span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">he her [grace&#39;s]&nbsp;</span><span title="aid" style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">aide
 /</span></div>
<div><span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">Can never seek, once dead in sins and lost;&quot;</span></div>
<div><span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif"><br>
</span></div>
<div><span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">Because of man&#39;s fallen state, man is unable to seek out the help of grace, so God offering man grace won&#39;t be enough to save mankind: somehow, mankind has
 to be made able to receive it.</span></div>
<div><span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif"><br>
</span></div>
<div><span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">Because mankind is unable to make atonement for themselves, Christ agrees to become man and offer himself up:</span></div>
<div><span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif"><br>
</span></div>
<div><span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">&quot;</span><span title="Atonement" style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">Attonement</span><span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">&nbsp;for
 himself or offering meet,</span></div>
<span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">Indebted and&nbsp;</span><span title="undone" style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">undon</span><span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">,
 hath none to bring:</span><span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">&nbsp;[ 235 ]</span><br style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">
<div><a name="14537cbfc888c335_sacrifice" style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">Behold</a><span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">&nbsp;</span><span title="me" style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">mee</span><span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">&nbsp;then,&nbsp;</span><span title="me" style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">mee</span><span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">&nbsp;for
 him, life for life&quot;</span></div>
<div><span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif"><br>
</span></div>
<div><span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">In these lines the state of being &quot;dead in sins and lost&quot; can only be remedied by atonement, but because of man&#39;s fallen state, man is unable to offer atonement.
 Christ, however, being unfallen, can make himself such an offering by becoming human.</span></div>
<div><span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif"><br>
</span></div>
<div><span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">That seems to me to be the Milton&#39;s explanation for the existence of the cross: God offers grace, but mankind is unable to receive it, so Christ&#39;s sacrifice
 of himself, as a man, makes all of mankind able to receive God&#39;s grace.&nbsp;</span></div>
<div><span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif"><br>
</span></div>
<div><span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">As has been mentioned, I think, there&#39;s also the problem of a just penalty for sin: God is the judge or ruler of a moral universe and mankind, having sinned,
 deserves punishment:</span></div>
<div><span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif"><br>
</span></div>
<div><span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">&quot;</span><span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">But yet all is not&nbsp;</span><span title="done" style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">don</span><span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">;
 Man disobeying,</span></div>
<span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">Disloyal breaks his&nbsp;</span><span title="fealty" style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">fealtie</span><span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">,
 and&nbsp;</span><span title="sins" style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">sinns</span><br style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">
<span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">Against the high&nbsp;</span><span title="Supremacy" style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">Supremacie</span><span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">&nbsp;of&nbsp;</span><span title="Heaven" style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">Heav&#39;n</span><span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">,</span><span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">&nbsp;[
 205 ]</span><br style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">
<span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">Affecting God-head, and so&nbsp;</span><span title="losing" style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">loosing</span><span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">&nbsp;all,</span><br style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">

<span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">To expiate his Treason hath naught left,</span><br style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">
<span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">But to destruction sacred and devote,</span><br style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">
<span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">He with his whole&nbsp;</span><span title="posterity" style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">posteritie</span><span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">&nbsp;must&nbsp;</span><span title="die" style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">dye</span><span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">,</span><br style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">

<span title="Die" style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">Dye</span><span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">&nbsp;</span><span title="he" style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">hee</span><span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">&nbsp;or
 Justice must; unless for him</span><span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">&nbsp;[ 210 ]</span><br style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">
<span title="Some" style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">Som</span><span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">&nbsp;other able, and as willing,
 pay</span><br style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">
<span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">The rigid satisfaction, death for death.&quot;</span>
<div>
<div style="text-indent:24px"><font color="#000000" face="palatino, times, serif" size="3"><br>
</font></div>
<div style="text-indent:24px"><font color="#000000" face="palatino, times, serif" size="3">The two and a half lines seem like a fairly straightforward presentation of substitutionary atonement: either justice falls on humanity or on someone else. If that doesn&#39;t
 happen, then justice itself will die.</font></div>
<div>
<div><span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif"><br>
</span></div>
<div><span style="text-indent:24px;font-size:16px;font-family:palatino,times,serif">Jim&nbsp;</span></div>
</div>
</div>
</div>
<div class="gmail_extra"><br>
<br>
<div class="gmail_quote">On Sat, Apr 5, 2014 at 6:06 PM, Richard A. Strier <span dir="ltr">
&lt;<a href="mailto:rastrier@uchicago.edu" target="_blank">rastrier@uchicago.edu</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
<div>
<div style="direction:ltr;font-size:10pt;font-family:Arial">Well, here goes! &nbsp;I&#39;ll say it, and let the storm follow: &nbsp;Milton could hardly care less about the crucifixion and still be any sort of Christian. &nbsp;
<div><br>
</div>
<div>The Son&#39;s &quot;heroism&quot; in Book 3 is entirely adventitious, since, after the proem, the action of the Book OPENS with God&#39;s decision to pardon man on purely moral/rational grounds (he was misled -- but then, so were Satan&#39;s followers-- but that&#39;s another problem).
 &nbsp;In any case, &quot;Man therefore shall find grace&quot; is determined, absolutely and definitively, before the whole drama of sacrifice takes place. &nbsp;The critics who think Satan&#39;s heroism false and the Son&#39;s true have it backwards. &nbsp;Someone had to do what Satan did,
 if his plan was to succeed (and it is not clear that anyone else was going to volunteer); the Son&#39;s Great Act is strictly unnecessary -- it&#39;s Milton trying to look orthodox, as if he believed in Anselmic atonement theory, when in fact he has already worked
 things out in his purely rationalistic way.</div>
<div><br>
</div>
<div>And of course, the crucifixion is notoriously difficult to find in the account of history in Bks XI-XII. &nbsp;It takes up 3 lines (XII: 411-13), and even there, Milton finds the abjection intolerable, and immediately makes the event a military triumph and
 reversal of torture -- &quot;But to the Cross he nails thy Enemies.&quot;<br>
<div><br>
</div>
<div>RS<br>
<div>
<div style="font-family:Tahoma;font-size:13px">
<div style="font-family:Tahoma;font-size:13px">
<div style="font-family:Tahoma;font-size:13px"><br>
</div>
</div>
</div>
</div>
<div style="font-size:16px;font-family:Times New Roman">
<hr>
<div style="direction:ltr"><font face="Tahoma" color="#000000"><b>From:</b> <a href="mailto:milton-l-bounces@lists.richmond.edu" target="_blank">
milton-l-bounces@lists.richmond.edu</a> [<a href="mailto:milton-l-bounces@lists.richmond.edu" target="_blank">milton-l-bounces@lists.richmond.edu</a>] on behalf of alan horn [<a href="mailto:alanshorn@gmail.com" target="_blank">alanshorn@gmail.com</a>]<br>

<b>Sent:</b> Saturday, April 05, 2014 4:40 PM<br>
<b>To:</b> John Milton Discussion List<br>
<b>Subject:</b> Re: [Milton-L] tree of life<br>
</font><br>
</div>
<div></div>
<div>
<div dir="ltr">
<div class="gmail_extra">
<div class="gmail_quote">
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
<div dir="ltr">
<div>why is the Tree of Life there at all? Milton seems to strip it of any function in the literal narrative and reduce it to a symbol prefiguring Christian salvation. Does this get us any closer to establishing a symmetrical relation between the Tree of Knowledge
 and the Tree of Life?</div>
</div>
</blockquote>
<div><br>
</div>
<div>The Tree of Life is the type of the cross. Jesus dying on the cross in obedience to the law of God makes good Adam&rsquo;s disobedience in eating of that other tree. So Christ (the anti-type of Satan, who offered the fruit of the Tree of Knowledge, or death)
 redeems from death all those who &ldquo;offered life / Neglect not&rdquo; (XII, 425-6). The Tree of Life is identified with the true church in Book IV and Satan who perches on it as he scopes out Eden to corrupt clergy (193).</div>

<div><br>
</div>
</div>
</div>
</div>
</div>
</div>
</div>
</div>
</div>
</div>
<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
Milton-L mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu" target="_blank">Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu</a><br>
Manage your list membership and access list archives at <a href="http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l" target="_blank">
http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l</a><br>
<br>
Milton-L web site: <a href="http://johnmilton.org/" target="_blank">http://johnmilton.org/</a><br>
</blockquote>
</div>
<br>
<br clear="all">
<div><br>
</div>
-- <br>
<div dir="ltr">Dr. James Rovira
<div>Associate Professor of English</div>
<div>Tiffin University</div>
<div><a href="http://www.jamesrovira.com" target="_blank">http://www.jamesrovira.com</a></div>
<div>Blake and Kierkegaard: Creation and Anxiety</div>
<div>Continuum 2010</div>
<div><a href="http://jamesrovira.com/blake-and-kierkegaard-creation-and-anxiety/" target="_blank">http://jamesrovira.com/blake-and-kierkegaard-creation-and-anxiety/</a><br>
</div>
<div>Text, Identity, Subjectivity</div>
<div><a href="http://scalar.usc.edu/works/text-identity-subjectivity/index" target="_blank">http://scalar.usc.edu/works/text-identity-subjectivity/index</a><br>
</div>
</div>
</div>
</div>
</div></div></div>
</div>
</div>
</div>

<br>_______________________________________________<br>
Milton-L mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu">Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu</a><br>
Manage your list membership and access list archives at <a href="http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l" target="_blank">http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l</a><br>
<br>
Milton-L web site: <a href="http://johnmilton.org/" target="_blank">http://johnmilton.org/</a><br></blockquote></div><br><br clear="all"><div><br></div>-- <br><div dir="ltr">Dr. James Rovira<div>Associate Professor of English</div>
<div>Tiffin University</div><div><a href="http://www.jamesrovira.com" target="_blank">http://www.jamesrovira.com</a></div><div>Blake and Kierkegaard: Creation and Anxiety</div><div>Continuum 2010</div><div><a href="http://jamesrovira.com/blake-and-kierkegaard-creation-and-anxiety/" target="_blank">http://jamesrovira.com/blake-and-kierkegaard-creation-and-anxiety/</a><br>
</div><div>Text, Identity, Subjectivity</div><div><a href="http://scalar.usc.edu/works/text-identity-subjectivity/index" target="_blank">http://scalar.usc.edu/works/text-identity-subjectivity/index</a><br></div></div>
</div>