<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<HTML dir=ltr><HEAD>
<META content=text/html;charset=Windows-1252 http-equiv=Content-Type>
<STYLE id=owaParaStyle type=text/css></STYLE>

<META name=GENERATOR content="MSHTML 11.00.9600.16521"></HEAD>
<BODY id=MailContainerBody 
style="PADDING-TOP: 15px; PADDING-LEFT: 10px; PADDING-RIGHT: 10px" leftMargin=0 
topMargin=0 CanvasTabStop="true" fpstyle="1" ocsi="0" 
name="Compose message area">
<DIV><FONT face=Calibri>That's an old storm. Empson beat you to it.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Calibri></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Calibri>And if the Trinity is co-omniscient, God foreknows that 
the Son will volunteer--just as Satan foreknows that he will volunteer--so 
Empson's charge that he "stacked the deck" has merit. (Not only that, but the 
Son knows that ultimately he will triumph--that death cannot claim him--while 
Satan has no idea what the consequences of his infiltration of Eden will be, 
should he be caught.) That anti-parallel and its logical consequences has always 
bothered my far more than the Tree of Life or what kind of fruit grew on the 
Tree of Knowledge--and I don't see how Milton (or theology) can resolve it. 
</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Calibri></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Calibri>It's the sort of thing my old priest would have frowned 
at me over his glasses for inquiring about, intoning, "If you can ask that, you 
have no faith."</FONT></DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><BR></DIV>
<DIV style="FONT: 10pt Tahoma">
<DIV style="BACKGROUND: #f5f5f5">
<DIV style="font-color: black"><B>From:</B> <A title=rastrier@uchicago.edu 
href="mailto:rastrier@uchicago.edu">Richard A. Strier</A> </DIV>
<DIV><B>Sent:</B> Saturday, April 05, 2014 6:06 PM</DIV>
<DIV><B>To:</B> <A title=milton-l@lists.richmond.edu 
href="mailto:milton-l@lists.richmond.edu">John Milton Discussion List</A> </DIV>
<DIV><B>Subject:</B> Re: [Milton-L] crucifixion</DIV></DIV></DIV>
<DIV><BR></DIV>
<DIV 
style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; COLOR: #000000; DIRECTION: ltr">Well, 
here goes! &nbsp;I'll say it, and let the storm follow: &nbsp;Milton could 
hardly care less about the crucifixion and still be any sort of Christian. 
&nbsp; 
<DIV><BR></DIV>
<DIV>The Son's "heroism" in Book 3 is entirely adventitious, since, after the 
proem, the action of the Book OPENS with God's decision to pardon man on purely 
moral/rational grounds (he was misled -- but then, so were Satan's followers-- 
but that's another problem). &nbsp;In any case, "Man therefore shall find grace" 
is determined, absolutely and definitively, before the whole drama of sacrifice 
takes place. &nbsp;The critics who think Satan's heroism false and the Son's 
true have it backwards. &nbsp;Someone had to do what Satan did, if his plan was 
to succeed (and it is not clear that anyone else was going to volunteer); the 
Son's Great Act is strictly unnecessary -- it's Milton trying to look orthodox, 
as if he believed in Anselmic atonement theory, when in fact he has already 
worked things out in his purely rationalistic way.</DIV>
<DIV><BR></DIV>
<DIV>And of course, the crucifixion is notoriously difficult to find in the 
account of history in Bks XI-XII. &nbsp;It takes up 3 lines (XII: 411-13), and 
even there, Milton finds the abjection intolerable, and immediately makes the 
event a military triumph and reversal of torture -- "But to the Cross he nails 
thy Enemies."<BR>
<DIV><BR></DIV>
<DIV>RS<BR>
<DIV>
<DIV style="FONT-SIZE: 13px; FONT-FAMILY: Tahoma">
<DIV style="FONT-SIZE: 13px; FONT-FAMILY: Tahoma">
<DIV 
style="FONT-SIZE: 13px; FONT-FAMILY: Tahoma"><BR></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></BODY></HTML>