<div dir="ltr">










<style>
<!--
 /* Font Definitions */
@font-face
        {font-family:Cambria;
        panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4;
        mso-font-charset:0;
        mso-generic-font-family:auto;
        mso-font-pitch:variable;
        mso-font-signature:3 0 0 0 1 0;}
 /* Style Definitions */
p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal
        {mso-style-parent:"";
        margin-top:0in;
        margin-right:0in;
        margin-bottom:10.0pt;
        margin-left:0in;
        mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
        font-size:12.0pt;
        font-family:"Times New Roman";
        mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria;
        mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;
        mso-fareast-font-family:Cambria;
        mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-latin;
        mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria;
        mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;
        mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman";
        mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}
@page Section1
        {size:8.5in 11.0in;
        margin:1.0in 1.25in 1.0in 1.25in;
        mso-header-margin:.5in;
        mso-footer-margin:.5in;
        mso-paper-source:0;}
div.Section1
        {page:Section1;}
-->
</style>






<p class="MsoNormal">The &ldquo;contradiction&rdquo; between Milton&rsquo;s youthful humanism and
his final rejection of the Platonic Academy is something I tried to explain in
The Christian Revolutionary, but many Miltonists, understandably favoring his
early idealist point of view, found my interpretation distasteful, so that the
explanation has gone largely unregarded. I do not find a &ldquo;contradiction&rdquo; but a
sustained and plausible evolution. Most of the book&rsquo;s argument can be found via
Preview in Google Books for &ldquo;The Christian Revolutionary&rdquo;. Best wishes, Hugh
Richmond</p>





</div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Mon, Feb 10, 2014 at 10:52 PM, Salwa Khoddam <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:skhoddam@cox.net" target="_blank">skhoddam@cox.net</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><u></u>





<div bgcolor="#ffffff">
<div><font face="Arial">&quot;manifest contradiction between what is said in 
Heaven and what is said on Earth.&quot; (Professor Fleming).</font></div>
<div><font face="Arial"></font>&nbsp;</div>
<div><font face="Arial">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Although&nbsp;Professor Gillum 
makes a very strong argument for the reconciliation of&nbsp;the Son&#39;s speech in 
Heaven and God-the-Son&#39;s&nbsp;speech on Earth regarding the punishment of the 
serpent, I find&nbsp;several other &quot;contradictions&quot;&nbsp;in Milton&#39;s writings, 
which push me more&nbsp;towards agreeing with Professor Fleming, if I have 
understood him correctly.&nbsp;</font></div>
<div><font face="Arial">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; If&nbsp;I can pivot to another 
&quot;contradiction,&quot; if I may, I would like to ask for your 
thoughts&nbsp;on&nbsp;the&nbsp;passage&nbsp;where Christ condemns&nbsp;classical 
learning in PR, bk. 4, ll. 285-64. I&#39;m sure many of you have worked out any 
seeming contradictions here and written about them, but for me this 
passage&nbsp;is puzzling since I feel it contradicts other&nbsp;stated 
views&nbsp;by Milton. I can understand Christ&#39;s satement: &quot;[h]e who receives / 
light from above, from the fountain of light&nbsp;/ No other doctrine needs, 
though granted true&quot; (4. 288-90).&nbsp;It agrees with 
what&nbsp;Milton&nbsp;wrote elsewhere (I can&#39;t find the source right now), that 
&quot;a plain unlearned man that lives well by that light which he has, is better, 
and wiser, and edifies others more towards a godly and happy life.&quot;&nbsp;But . . 
. .&nbsp;when Christ refers to&nbsp;bringing &quot;[a] spirit and judgment equal or 
superior&quot; to&nbsp;one&#39;s readings (324), Milton seems to&nbsp;be prescribng an 
intellectual regimen (as in &quot;Of Education&quot;) which may be open to all, 
or&nbsp;maybe&nbsp; essentially aristocratic. If so, then one questions whether 
this &quot;superior judgment&quot; can be found in the&nbsp; &quot;plain unlearned man.&quot; 
Milton&#39;s lifelong reading and study of the classical languages and literature, 
science, medicine, etc.,&nbsp;also contradicts&nbsp;the Puritanism that 
dictates&nbsp;this passage&nbsp;here.&nbsp; Milton&nbsp;could be stating a 
&quot;double truth,&quot; like many others of his age, that what is useful in the world of 
nature is useless in the world of grace--a clear contradiction, logically 
speaking, and difficult to reconcile for most of us.&nbsp;</font><font face="Arial">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </font></div>
<div><font face="Arial">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</font><font face="Arial">Thanks in advance for your thoughts.</font></div>
<div><font face="Arial">Best,</font></div>
<div><font face="Arial">Salwa</font></div>
<div><font face="Arial"></font>&nbsp;</div>
<div><font face="Arial"></font>&nbsp;</div>
<div>Salwa Khoddam PhD<br>Professor of English Emerita<br>Oklahoma City 
University<br>Author of *Mythopoeic Narnia:<br>Memory, Metaphor, and 
Metamorphoses <br>in The Chronicles of Narnia*<br><a href="mailto:skhoddam@cox.net" target="_blank">skhoddam@cox.net</a></div>
<blockquote style="BORDER-LEFT:#000000 2px solid;PADDING-LEFT:5px;PADDING-RIGHT:0px;MARGIN-LEFT:5px;MARGIN-RIGHT:0px">
  <div style="FONT:10pt arial">----- Original Message ----- </div>
  <div style="FONT:10pt arial;BACKGROUND:#e4e4e4"><b>From:</b> 
  <a title="jfleming@sfu.ca" href="mailto:jfleming@sfu.ca" target="_blank">JD Fleming</a> </div>
  <div style="FONT:10pt arial"><b>To:</b> <a title="milton-l@lists.richmond.edu" href="mailto:milton-l@lists.richmond.edu" target="_blank">John Milton Discussion List</a> 
  </div>
  <div style="FONT:10pt arial"><b>Sent:</b> Monday, February 10, 2014 4:18 
  PM</div>
  <div style="FONT:10pt arial"><b>Subject:</b> Re: [Milton-L] &quot;Justice for the 
  Serpent&quot; Revived</div>
  <div><br></div>
  <div style="font-size:12pt;font-family:tahoma,new york,times,serif">Thanks 
  Michael. I would point out there is a difference between thinking &quot;it just 
  doesn&#39;t make sense&quot; and thinking &quot;what is experienced here is a failure of 
  sense.&quot; I&#39;m arguing for a Milton who recognizes and deploys the latter as a 
  significant hermeneutic configuration in its own right. <i>Unsinn</i> becomes 
  the sign, or perhaps form, of the fall. Luther, somewhat similarly, seems to 
  consider it exegetically respectable to say, in some cases: &quot;We must admit an 
  inability to understand this scripture.&quot; This he prefers to the impulse to 
  make everything intelligible, which leads toward allegory.
  <div><br></div>
  <div>I like the overdetermined, tripartite uncertainty in the antecedence of 
  &quot;his curse&quot;--but would tie that, too, into the unsatisfactory and painful 
  nature of the fallen judicial scenario. Best wishes, JDF</div>
  <div>&nbsp;
  <div>
  <hr>

  <div style="font-size:12pt;font-style:normal;text-decoration:none;font-family:Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-weight:normal"><b>From: 
  </b>&quot;Michael Gillum&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:mgillum@unca.edu" target="_blank">mgillum@unca.edu</a>&gt;<br><b>To: </b>&quot;John Milton 
  Discussion List&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:milton-l@lists.richmond.edu" target="_blank">milton-l@lists.richmond.edu</a>&gt;<br><b>Sent: </b>Monday, 
  10 February, 2014 11:17:13<br><b>Subject: </b>Re: [Milton-L] &quot;Justice for the 
  Serpent&quot; Revived<br><br>
  <div dir="ltr">JD Fleming,
  <div><br></div>
  <div>Clearly, Milton is up to something in flaunting the contradiction between 
  the Son&#39;s &quot;Conviction to the serpent none belongs&quot; and the narrator&#39;s &quot;And on 
  the Serpent thus his curse let fall.&quot; Your reading is a good one and perhaps 
  more interesting than mine. However, I take the contradiction as a sort of 
  tease, inviting the reader to think about whether what happens to the serpent 
  might be something other than a conviction. I imagine Milton may have done 
  some thinking along those lines as he struggled to make Gen. 3:14-15 morally 
  intelligible to himself. So I have tried to sketch out some ways in which 
  Milton&#39;s text allows us to see God&#39;s pronouncement over the serpent as 
  something other than a conviction of the serpent. Certainly my argument is not 
  an airtight exoneration of God&#39;s justice in the episode. It is just an attempt 
  to think along with Milton in his process of &quot;teasing rationality out of the 
  Genesis account.&quot; I guess the reason I am not attracted to your very 
  interesting reading is that I don&#39;t think of Milton as one who would think &quot;It 
  just doesn&#39;t make sense.&quot;&nbsp;</div>
  <div><br></div>
  <div>Changing the subject a bit, an interesting ambiguity in the line &quot;And on 
  the Serpent thus his curse let fall&quot; is that &quot;his curse&quot; could be God&#39;s curse, 
  or the serpent&#39;s curse, or Satan&#39;s curse.&nbsp;</div>
  <div><br></div>
  <table style="FONT-FAMILY:Times" align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0">
    <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td>. . . God at last</td>
      <td><a name="1441fb274b5b470f_171"></a></td></tr>
    <tr>
      <td>To Satan, first in sin, his doom applied,</td>
      <td><a name="1441fb274b5b470f_172"></a></td></tr>
    <tr>
      <td>Though in mysterious terms, judged as then best;</td>
      <td><a name="1441fb274b5b470f_173"></a></td></tr>
    <tr>
      <td>And on the Serpent thus his curse let fall. . . 
    .<br><br></td></tr></tbody></table>
  <div>&nbsp;</div></div>
  <div class="gmail_extra"><br><br>
  <div class="gmail_quote">On Mon, Feb 10, 2014 at 12:04 PM, JD Fleming <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:jfleming@sfu.ca" target="_blank">jfleming@sfu.ca</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>
  <blockquote style="BORDER-LEFT:#ccc 1px solid;MARGIN:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;PADDING-LEFT:1ex" class="gmail_quote">
    <div>
    <div style="FONT-FAMILY:tahoma,new york,times,serif;FONT-SIZE:12pt">Michael, I 
    can only repeat what I think I probably said before. In heaven:&nbsp;<span style="FONT-SIZE:12pt">&ldquo;Conviction to the serpent none belongs.&rdquo; Exactly. 
    No conviction (legal) attaches to him because he has no conviction 
    (cognitive). And then, forthwith, he gets convicted on Earth. 
    So--?&nbsp;</span>
    <div><span style="FONT-SIZE:12pt"><br></span></div>
    <div><span style="FONT-SIZE:12pt">The interesting issue here, in my view, 
    has nothing to do (pace Empson et al) with &ldquo;punishment of innocents.&rdquo; Nor 
    (pace Lewis et al) with exquisite attenuations of the divine judgment. In 
    short, nothing to do with the&nbsp;</span><span style="FONT-SIZE:12pt">kind 
    of interminable moralistic tug-o-war that characterizes--still!--so much 
    talk about Milton!</span></div>
    <div><span style="FONT-SIZE:12pt"><br></span></div>
    <div><span style="FONT-SIZE:12pt">Rather, the interesting issue is the 
    thematic effect that Milton derives from the manifest contradiction between 
    what is said in Heaven and what is said on Earth. (On manifest textual 
    problems, and the limits of explaining them away, one could refer to both 
    Luther&#39;s Lectures on Genesis and Milton&#39;s CD.&nbsp;</span><span style="FONT-SIZE:12pt">I have some stuff on this in the Conclusion 
    of&nbsp;</span><i style="FONT-SIZE:12pt">Milton&rsquo;s Secrecy</i><span style="FONT-SIZE:12pt">.</span><span style="FONT-SIZE:12pt">) 
    This&nbsp;</span><span style="FONT-SIZE:12pt">contradiction functions, very 
    effectively, as an index of the Fall. In the gap between the Son&rsquo;s speech in 
    Heaven, and God-the-Son&rsquo;s speech in the garden, Milton says: &ldquo;this is what 
    the Fall is. This is what it&rsquo;s like.&rdquo; Ditto re: God-the-Son&#39;s speech 
    &ldquo;explaining&rdquo; the injustice of convicting the serpent, which he has himself 
    just eschewed in Heaven. The text says: &ldquo;Now things don&rsquo;t make sense any 
    more. Now you have to listen to bunk like this and nod seriously.&rdquo; Which is 
    a pretty cool effect, in my opinion.&nbsp;</span></div>
    <div><span style="FONT-SIZE:12pt"><br></span></div>
    <div><span style="FONT-SIZE:12pt">But I think we have to accept it, if we 
    are to get it. Best wishes, JDF</span></div>
    <div>
    <p class="MsoNormal"><u></u><u></u></p>
    <p class="MsoNormal"><u></u><u></u>&nbsp;</p>
    <p class="MsoNormal">--<u></u><u></u></p><br>
    <hr>

    <div style="FONT-STYLE:normal;FONT-FAMILY:Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;FONT-SIZE:12pt;FONT-WEIGHT:normal;TEXT-DECORATION:none"><b>From: 
    </b>&quot;J. Michael Gillum&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:mgillum@ret.unca.edu" target="_blank">mgillum@ret.unca.edu</a>&gt;<br><b>To: </b>&quot;John Milton 
    Discussion List&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu" target="_blank">Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu</a>&gt;<br><b>Sent: </b>Thursday, 
    30 January, 2014 08:08:21<br><b>Subject: </b>[Milton-L] &quot;Justice for the 
    Serpent&quot; Revived
    <div><br><br>
    <div dir="ltr">Here is a short article by me that maybe will provoke some 
    argument. It is on the open web. I really enjoyed the discussion that Prof. 
    Shoulson started a couple of years ago.
    <div><br></div>
    <div><a href="http://pachome.org/wp/postscript/?page_id=1014" target="_blank">http://pachome.org/wp/postscript/?page_id=1014</a><br></div>
    <div><br></div>
    <div>Michael</div></div><br></div>
    <div>_______________________________________________<br>Milton-L mailing 
    list<br><a href="mailto:Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu" target="_blank">Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu</a><br>Manage your list membership 
    and access list archives at <a href="http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l" target="_blank">http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l</a><br><br>Milton-L 
    web site: <a href="http://johnmilton.org/" target="_blank">http://johnmilton.org/</a></div></div><span><font color="#888888"><br><br><br>-- <br>
    <div><span></span><font size="+0"><font style="FONT-FAMILY:&#39;trebuchet ms&#39;,sans-serif" size="4">J</font><font face="tahoma, new york, times, serif">ames Dougal Fleming<br>Associate 
    Professor<br>Department of English<br>Simon Fraser University<br><a href="tel:778-782-4713" target="_blank">778-782-4713</a></font></font>
    <div><font face="tahoma, new york, times, serif"><br></font></div>
    <div><font face="tahoma, new york, times, serif">&quot;<span style="LINE-HEIGHT:23px">Upstairs was a room for travelers. &lsquo;You know, I 
    shall take it for the rest of my life,&rsquo; Vasili Ivanovich is reported to have 
    said as soon as he had entered it.&quot;</span></font></div>
    <div><span style="LINE-HEIGHT:23px"><font face="tahoma, new york, times, serif"><span style="WHITE-SPACE:pre-wrap"></span><font size="3">--&nbsp;Vladimir Nabokov, 
    </font><i>Cloud, Castle, Lake</i></font></span></div>
    <div style="FONT-FAMILY:&#39;trebuchet ms&#39;,sans-serif;FONT-SIZE:14pt"><br></div><span></span><br></div></font></span></div></div></div><br>_______________________________________________<br>Milton-L 
    mailing list<br><a href="mailto:Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu" target="_blank">Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu</a><br>Manage your list membership 
    and access list archives at <a href="http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l" target="_blank">http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l</a><br><br>Milton-L 
    web site: <a href="http://johnmilton.org/" target="_blank">http://johnmilton.org/</a><br></blockquote></div><br></div><br>_______________________________________________<br>Milton-L 
  mailing list<br><a href="mailto:Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu" target="_blank">Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu</a><br>Manage your list membership and 
  access list archives at 
  <a href="http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l" target="_blank">http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l</a><br><br>Milton-L web site: 
  <a href="http://johnmilton.org/" target="_blank">http://johnmilton.org/</a></div><br><br><br>-- <br>
  <div><span name="x"></span><font size="+0"><font style="FONT-FAMILY:&#39;trebuchet ms&#39;,sans-serif" size="4">J</font><font face="tahoma, new york, times, serif">ames Dougal Fleming<br>Associate 
  Professor<br>Department of English<br>Simon Fraser 
  University<br>778-782-4713</font></font>
  <div><font face="tahoma, new york, times, serif"><br></font></div>
  <div><font face="tahoma, new york, times, serif">&quot;<span style="line-height:23px">Upstairs was a 
  room for travelers. &lsquo;You know, I shall take it for the rest of my life,&rsquo; 
  Vasili Ivanovich is reported to have said as soon as he had entered 
  it.&quot;</span></font></div>
  <div><span style="line-height:23px"><font face="tahoma, new york, times, serif"><span style="white-space:pre-wrap"></span><font size="3">--&nbsp;Vladimir Nabokov, 
  </font><i>Cloud, Castle, Lake</i></font></span></div>
  <div style="FONT-FAMILY:&#39;trebuchet ms&#39;,sans-serif;FONT-SIZE:14pt"><br></div><span name="x"></span><br></div></div></div></div>
  <p>
  </p><hr>

  <p></p>_______________________________________________<br>Milton-L mailing 
  list<br><a href="mailto:Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu" target="_blank">Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu</a><br>Manage your list membership and access 
  list archives at 
  <a href="http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l" target="_blank">http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l</a><br><br>Milton-L web site: 
  <a href="http://johnmilton.org/" target="_blank">http://johnmilton.org/</a><p></p></blockquote></div>
<br>_______________________________________________<br>
Milton-L mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu">Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu</a><br>
Manage your list membership and access list archives at <a href="http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l" target="_blank">http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l</a><br>
<br>
Milton-L web site: <a href="http://johnmilton.org/" target="_blank">http://johnmilton.org/</a><br></blockquote></div><br></div>