<div dir="ltr">I&#39;m not exceeding the bounds of Milton&#39;s narrative, though: Sin lets Satan out of Hell. That has to be incorporated into the allegorical reading. How does that work? <div><br></div><div>I think you&#39;re giving too big a pass to allegory. I&#39;ve seen it work better than this, that&#39;s all. </div>
<div><br></div><div>Jim R</div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Sun, Oct 27, 2013 at 7:44 PM, alan horn <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:alanshorn@gmail.com" target="_blank">alanshorn@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr">Jim, let me refer you back to my earlier example of how taking an allegorical figure literally necessarily yields ridiculous results. That is itself a clue that your reading is missing the point.<div>
<br></div>
<div>The personification of sin as Sin has no implications for the representation of the nature of sin in the poem. In other words, Milton is not asking us to believe in sin as a real being with agency. Rather, Sin is a figure of speech that, together with the other elements of the episode, serves to metaphorically express a set of interrelated ideas that, as others have noted, is picked up and explained in the following Book.</div>
<span class="HOEnZb"><font color="#888888">
<div><br></div><div>Alan Horn</div></font></span></div>
</blockquote></div><div dir="ltr"><div><br></div></div>
</div></div>