<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<HTML><HEAD>
<META content="text/html; charset=windows-1252" http-equiv=Content-Type>
<META name=GENERATOR content="MSHTML 8.00.6001.19400">
<STYLE></STYLE>
</HEAD>
<BODY bgColor=#ffffff>
<DIV><FONT size=2 face=Arial>Professor Gillum,</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT size=2 face=Arial>Thanks for the clarification. But it seems to me 
that sometimes the rhymed iambic pentameter and blank verse (that of Milton, for 
instance)&nbsp;are discussed as if having come out of&nbsp;the 
same&nbsp;tradition,&nbsp;but one is English and the other is 
Italian.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT size=2 face=Arial>Thanks again,</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT size=2 face=Arial>Salwa</FONT></DIV>
<DIV>Salwa Khoddam PhD<BR>Professor of English Emerita<BR>Oklahoma City 
University<BR>Author of *Mythopoeic Narnia:<BR>Memory, Metaphor, and 
Metamorphoses <BR>in The Chronicles of Narnia*<BR><A 
href="mailto:skhoddam@cox.net">skhoddam@cox.net</A></DIV>
<BLOCKQUOTE 
style="BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px">
  <DIV style="FONT: 10pt arial">----- Original Message ----- </DIV>
  <DIV 
  style="FONT: 10pt arial; BACKGROUND: #e4e4e4; font-color: black"><B>From:</B> 
  <A title=mgillum@ret.unca.edu href="mailto:mgillum@ret.unca.edu">J. Michael 
  Gillum</A> </DIV>
  <DIV style="FONT: 10pt arial"><B>To:</B> <A title=milton-l@lists.richmond.edu 
  href="mailto:milton-l@lists.richmond.edu">John Milton Discussion List</A> 
  </DIV>
  <DIV style="FONT: 10pt arial"><B>Sent:</B> Friday, October 18, 2013 9:47 
  AM</DIV>
  <DIV style="FONT: 10pt arial"><B>Subject:</B> Re: [Milton-L] Milton's blank 
  verse: stresses and sources</DIV>
  <DIV><BR></DIV>
  <DIV dir=ltr>Salwa,
  <DIV><BR></DIV>
  <DIV>I was referring to iambic pentameter, which Chaucer was the first to 
  write in a sustained and deliberate manner, rather than blank verse. Yes, 
  Surrey was the first to publish blank verse. Before that, Wyatt was writing 
  decasyllables, many of which are iambic pentameters.I don't know whether Wyatt 
  clearly grasped the five-beat rhythm. In some poems he produces it fairly 
  consistently. In translations from the Italian, he does not. We cannot be sure 
  of his metrical intentions, except that he was looking to Italy for an 
  alternative to the doggerel rhythms of 15th century English verse.</DIV></DIV>
  <DIV class=gmail_extra><BR><BR>
  <DIV class=gmail_quote>On Fri, Oct 18, 2013 at 2:03 AM, Salwa Khoddam <SPAN 
  dir=ltr>&lt;<A href="mailto:skhoddam@cox.net" 
  target=_blank>skhoddam@cox.net</A>&gt;</SPAN> wrote:<BR>
  <BLOCKQUOTE 
  style="BORDER-LEFT: #ccc 1px solid; MARGIN: 0px 0px 0px 0.8ex; PADDING-LEFT: 1ex" 
  class=gmail_quote><U></U>
    <DIV bgcolor="#ffffff">
    <DIV class=im>
    <DIV><FONT face=Arial>"Chaucer invented English iambic pentameter (and Wyatt 
    revived it, sort of)<BR>with reference to the Italian 
    hendecasyllabo."</FONT></DIV>
    <DIV><FONT face=Arial></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV></DIV>
    <DIV>&nbsp; I have some questions regarding this statement: Although there 
    is some unrymed verse that can be scanned as iambic&nbsp;pentameter lines in 
    Chaucer's <EM>*Tale of Melibeus* </EM>and <EM>*The Parson's Tale*,</EM> 
    which&nbsp;are predominantly in prose,<EM>&nbsp;</EM>does that justify the 
    statement that "Chaucer invented English iambic pentameter."&nbsp;As C. S. 
    Lewis states, "The suggestion that he [Earl of Surrey] found blank verse in 
    the <EM>*Tale of Melibeus*</EM> does not seem to me worth 
    considering"&nbsp;(*<EM>English Literature*</EM> 
    233).&nbsp;&nbsp;Also,&nbsp;wasn't it&nbsp;Surrey&nbsp;who brought it to 
    England from&nbsp;Italy (possibly Molza’s translation of Virgil)&nbsp;and 
    who was the first to publish in Modern English blank verse translations from 
    the <EM>*Aeneid*</EM> (written ca.1540 and published in <EM>*Tottel's 
    Micsellany*</EM> in 1557 [*<EM>Princeton Encylopedia of Poetry and 
    Poetics*,</EM> 1974 ed., 78])? Did Wyatt also compose in blank verse?</DIV>
    <DIV>Thanks for the clarification.</DIV>
    <DIV>Salwa</DIV>
    <DIV><FONT face=Arial></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
    <DIV>Salwa Khoddam PhD<BR>Professor of English Emerita<BR>Oklahoma City 
    University<BR>Author of *Mythopoeic Narnia:<BR>Memory, Metaphor, and 
    Metamorphoses <BR>in The Chronicles of Narnia*<BR><A 
    href="mailto:skhoddam@cox.net" target=_blank>skhoddam@cox.net</A></DIV>
    <BLOCKQUOTE 
    style="BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px">
      <DIV class=im>
      <DIV style="FONT: 10pt arial">----- Original Message ----- </DIV>
      <DIV style="FONT: 10pt arial; BACKGROUND: #e4e4e4"><B>From:</B> <A 
      title=mgillum@ret.unca.edu href="mailto:mgillum@ret.unca.edu" 
      target=_blank>J. Michael Gillum</A> </DIV>
      <DIV style="FONT: 10pt arial"><B>To:</B> <A 
      title=milton-l@lists.richmond.edu 
      href="mailto:milton-l@lists.richmond.edu" target=_blank>John Milton 
      Discussion List</A> </DIV></DIV>
      <DIV class=im>
      <DIV style="FONT: 10pt arial"><B>Sent:</B> Thursday, October 17, 2013 
      11:44 AM</DIV>
      <DIV style="FONT: 10pt arial"><B>Subject:</B> Re: [Milton-L] Milton's 
      blank verse: stresses and sources</DIV>
      <DIV><BR></DIV></DIV>
      <DIV dir=ltr>
      <DIV class=im>Chaucer invented English iambic pentameter (and Wyatt 
      revived it, sort of) with reference to the Italian hendecasyllabo. But 
      Milton simply writes English iambic pentameter as it had existed since 
      Spenser (that is, the same variations in stress contour are found in 
      Spenser, Shakespeare, Jonson etc) except that Milton exploits enjambment 
      and non-medial cesura to a degree unprecedented in English versification. 
      So Carl's second question is an interesting one--does Tasso or any other 
      Italian poet known to Milton treat the line-boundary in such a cavalier 
      manner? 
      <DIV><BR></DIV></DIV>
      <DIV class=im>
      <DIV>In "My Last Duchess,"&nbsp;Browning breaks up the iambic line in PL 
      fashion, which has the effect of burying the couplet rhymes in 
      enjambments.&nbsp;&nbsp;I don't know if that is what Belli was talking 
      about in his comment on "natural-seeming" rhyme.</DIV></DIV></DIV>
      <DIV class=gmail_extra><BR><BR>
      <DIV class=gmail_quote>
      <DIV class=im>On Thu, Oct 17, 2013 at 2:45 AM, Dario Rivarossa <SPAN 
      dir=ltr>&lt;<A href="mailto:dario.rivarossa@gmail.com" 
      target=_blank>dario.rivarossa@gmail.com</A>&gt;</SPAN> wrote:<BR></DIV>
      <DIV>
      <DIV class=h5>
      <BLOCKQUOTE 
      style="BORDER-LEFT: #ccc 1px solid; MARGIN: 0px 0px 0px 0.8ex; PADDING-LEFT: 1ex" 
      class=gmail_quote>Fellow Miltonist JCarl Bellinger, in a private 
        message, asked for some<BR>pieces of information about Milton's verses 
        with reference to his<BR>Tassean precedents. The topic may be of some 
        interest here also, so<BR>here it is. Best!<BR><BR>&gt;Miltons blank 
        verse (...) &nbsp;is related somehow or other to Tasso's 
        practise<BR><BR>Yes, I think Milton's verses were 'Italian' 
        hendecasyllables. One may<BR>reply: But verses in PL only have 10 
        syllables!<BR>Of course. One of the rules with hendecasyllables is that 
        the last<BR>stress falls on the 10th syllable. So, if the last word (as 
        it is<BR>often the case in English) is a brief word, having its stress 
        on the<BR>first-and-last syllable, the verse stops there. But there are 
        some<BR>instances in PL where the last word is a longer one, and in that 
        case<BR>the verse regularly shows 11 syllables.<BR><BR>&gt;Do whole 
        sentences run thru the verse with little or no reference to the verse 
        line<BR><BR>Tasso used the blank verse in his long poem "Il Mondo 
        Creato" (The<BR>Creation of the World). The language there is 
        experimental, with many<BR>expressions, phrases, etc., being taken from 
        everyday talks, but he<BR>anyway follows the rules of hendecasyllables, 
        so stresses do fall on<BR>certain syllables in each verse, even in this 
        case.<BR>19th century poet Giuseppe Gioachino Belli, who wrote poems in 
        the<BR>dialect of Rome, said that he tried to (and he did) make 
        sentences<BR>sound as 'natural' as possible, as if the rhymes were just 
        coming out<BR>by 
        chance.<BR>_______________________________________________<BR>Milton-L 
        mailing list<BR><A href="mailto:Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu" 
        target=_blank>Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu</A><BR>Manage your list 
        membership and access list archives at <A 
        href="http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l" 
        target=_blank>http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l</A><BR><BR>Milton-L 
        web site: <A href="http://johnmilton.org/" 
        target=_blank>http://johnmilton.org/</A><BR></BLOCKQUOTE></DIV></DIV></DIV><BR></DIV>
      <P></P>
      <HR>

      <DIV class=im>
      <P></P>_______________________________________________<BR>Milton-L mailing 
      list<BR><A href="mailto:Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu" 
      target=_blank>Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu</A><BR>Manage your list 
      membership and access list archives at <A 
      href="http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l" 
      target=_blank>http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l</A><BR><BR>Milton-L 
      web site: <A href="http://johnmilton.org/" 
      target=_blank>http://johnmilton.org/</A></DIV>
      <P></P></BLOCKQUOTE></DIV><BR>_______________________________________________<BR>Milton-L 
    mailing list<BR><A 
    href="mailto:Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu">Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu</A><BR>Manage 
    your list membership and access list archives at <A 
    href="http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l" 
    target=_blank>http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l</A><BR><BR>Milton-L 
    web site: <A href="http://johnmilton.org/" 
    target=_blank>http://johnmilton.org/</A><BR></BLOCKQUOTE></DIV><BR></DIV>
  <P>
  <HR>

  <P></P>_______________________________________________<BR>Milton-L mailing 
  list<BR>Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu<BR>Manage your list membership and access 
  list archives at 
  http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l<BR><BR>Milton-L web site: 
  http://johnmilton.org/</BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>