<div dir="ltr">A small thought about the opening &quot;of&quot;--think of how many Latin treatises have titles beginning with &quot;de.&quot; It suggests a dimension of PL that distinguishes it from classical epic and partially aligns it with the tradition of literary &quot;anatomy&quot;--the intellectual aspect, examining a concept from various perspectives.</div>
<div class="gmail_extra"><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Mon, Sep 16, 2013 at 7:44 PM, Gregory Machacek <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:Gregory.Machacek@marist.edu" target="_blank">Gregory.Machacek@marist.edu</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><font face="Default Sans Serif,Verdana,Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif"><div>Prior to Nancy, here, nobody <i>had</i> brought up the possibility of stressing &quot;Of.&quot;  As Jim points out, his raising that possibility was based on a <i>misreading</i> of one of Richard Strier&#39;s posts.</div>
<div><br></div><div>But, just to further stir the pot with this line, I&#39;ll mention that, years ago, in a Milton Quarterly article, I floated the idea that the opening two words of PL pun on the word Woman. Adam recounts naming Eve &quot;Woman,&quot; which he translates/glosses as meaning &quot;Of man / extracted&quot; (8.896-7) and KJB 2.23 also renders this using the phrase &quot;of man.&quot;  (Evidently the Hebrew means something more like &quot;her man.&quot;).  Anyway, the run-together noun that emerges in this punning sense would I think be pronounced with the stress on the first syllable: &quot;OFman&#39;s.&quot;  So there, now someone has (semi-)seriously proposed stressing the first syllable.</div>
<div><br></div><div>What I contrast with Milton&#39;s lowly preposition &quot;of&quot; is not &quot;sing,&quot; but menin or andra, the single summarizing noun that is the very first word of the Iliad and Odyssey.  I agree that it is odd to start an epic with a preposition (though I don&#39;t think you have to stress it to bring out FIRST).</div>
<div><br></div><div>For as much as I&#39;ve enjoyed this conversation, there&#39;s a level on which JD Fleming is not wrong.  It takes so much explication to bring out the subtleties of poetic rhythms that the explanatory superstructure always seems to overwhelm the experiential foundation.  Rhythms are too gossamer to bear the weight of the interpretations we foist on them. Still, there&#39;s <i>something</i> in the contrast between the rhythmic murkiness of the first line and what Kat Lecky calls the &quot;easy cadence&quot; of the last four lines.  And what else are you going to do but talk til you get said what it is?<div class="im">
<br><br><br>Greg Machacek<br>Professor of English<br>Marist College</div></div><br><br><font color="#990099">-----<a href="mailto:milton-l-bounces@lists.richmond.edu" target="_blank">milton-l-bounces@lists.richmond.edu</a> wrote: -----</font><div style="padding-left:5px">
<div style="padding-right:0px;padding-left:5px;border-left:solid black 2px">To: John Milton Discussion List &lt;<a href="mailto:milton-l@lists.richmond.edu" target="_blank">milton-l@lists.richmond.edu</a>&gt;<br>From: Nancy Charlton <u></u><br>
Sent by: <a href="mailto:milton-l-bounces@lists.richmond.edu" target="_blank">milton-l-bounces@lists.richmond.edu</a><br>Date: 09/16/2013 04:40PM<div class="im"><br>Subject: Re: [Milton-L] Scansion and line 1<br><br></div>
<div><div class="h5"><div>If you stress &quot;of&quot; it might bring up a question Milton doesn&#39;t really get into except in passing. OF man&#39;s FIRST dis-o-BED-yence...  Implies that there are subsequent disobediences, any of which might merit epic treatment. To stress OF would tie the phrase more forcefully to &quot;Sing&quot;, possibly at the expense of the other matters catalogued before the invocation is made. Possibly their inclusion at the very opening is a distancing on JM&#39;s part is an attempt to keep the focus on the divine rather than the human history. </div>
<div><br></div><div>The Iliad&#39;s &quot;Sing&quot; is an imperative or vocative, whereas &quot;of&quot; is a lowly preposition which in classical languages would be part of a genitive noun and given little stress even as a long-syllabled diphthong. </div>
<div><br></div><div>As to the pronunciation of the d-word, is it not possible that JM, fluent in Italian, might have read the ie as y? Or would this come out as in j or dg, as someone suggested yesterday?</div><div><br></div>
<div>Nancy Charlton<br><br>Sent from my iPhone</div><div><br>On Sep 16, 2013, at 12:10 PM, James Rovira &lt;<a href="mailto:jamesrovira@gmail.com" target="_blank">jamesrovira@gmail.com</a>&gt; wrote:<br><br></div><blockquote type="cite">
<div><div dir="ltr">I initially brought up the possibility of a stress on &quot;of&quot; because, as Ben I think observed, I misread Richard&#39;s initial cap as indicating a stressed syllable. Yes, I agree, prepositions are normally unstressed both in everyday speech and in poetry. Yes, like all unstressed syllables, they can be take a stress under specific conditions. Having misread Richard&#39;s scansion, I considered the possibility of stressing the first word of an epic poem to be interesting -- like Sing at the beginning of the Iliad. However, I never would have considered the possibility of a stress on &quot;of&quot; had it not been for that misreading. <div>

<br></div><div>Many apologies for the confusion.</div><div><br></div><div>Jim R<br><div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Mon, Sep 16, 2013 at 2:58 PM, J. Michael Gillum <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:mgillum@ret.unca.edu" target="_blank">mgillum@ret.unca.edu</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>

<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr">These are good comments by Greg and Richard, but I am puzzled as to why people are saying that &quot;of,&quot; the first syllable of PL, is stressed. Prepositions are unstressed unless for contrastive purposes in speech. There is nothing in the text to suggest  that such &quot;rhetorical&quot; stress is called for. And there is nothing in the structure of the line that suggests the first syllable realizes a beat (metrical accent). Quite the contrary.<div>


<br></div><div>Perhaps I should have said that prepositions are normally unstressed unless you are a local public radio announcer.</div></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br></div></blockquote></div>
</div></div></div></div>
</div></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><div><span>_______________________________________________</span><br><span>Milton-L mailing list</span><br><span><a href="mailto:Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu" target="_blank">Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu</a></span><br>
<span>Manage your list membership and access list archives at <a href="http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l" target="_blank">http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l</a></span><br><span></span><br>
<span>Milton-L web site: <a href="http://johnmilton.org/" target="_blank">http://johnmilton.org/</a></span></div></blockquote>
<div><font face="Courier New,Courier,monospace" size="3">_______________________________________________<br>Milton-L mailing list<br><a href="mailto:Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu" target="_blank">Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu</a><br>
Manage your list membership and access list archives at <a href="http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l" target="_blank">http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l</a><br><br>Milton-L web site: <a href="http://johnmilton.org/" target="_blank">http://johnmilton.org/</a></font></div>
<u></u></div></div></div></div><div></div></font><br>_______________________________________________<br>
Milton-L mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu">Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu</a><br>
Manage your list membership and access list archives at <a href="http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l" target="_blank">http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l</a><br>
<br>
Milton-L web site: <a href="http://johnmilton.org/" target="_blank">http://johnmilton.org/</a><br></blockquote></div><br></div>