<div dir="ltr">Ben Moran--See <i>Well-Weigh&#39;d Syllables</i> by Derek Attridge. This is an account of the Elizabethans&#39; muddled attempt to come to a conceptual understanding of English meter in relation to the Latin metric system that they already understood, or thought they did. They were hopelessly confused. For example Sidney said (in paraphrase), &quot;We don&#39;t have meter; we have rime as our ornament instead.&quot;<div>
<br></div><div style>I don&#39;t know of anyone speaking of the value of metric inversions. There was some early criticism of inversions as not properly metrical.</div><div style><br></div><div style>It is not clear what Milton&#39;s conceptual understanding of English meter was beyond counting syllables. However, he does pretty much the same variations as Spenser and Shakespeare. It&#39;s the extreme use of off-center cesuras and enjambment that are unusual. &#39;Lycidas&#39; has some odd terminal inversions.</div>
</div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Sun, Sep 15, 2013 at 4:12 PM, Benjamin (Ben) Moran <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:bamoran@crimson.ua.edu" target="_blank">bamoran@crimson.ua.edu</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div>I may have misread Professor Strier&#39;s email, but I didn&#39;t think he was placing a stress on &#39;of,&#39; but simply capitalizing the first letter of the line/sentence.  I&#39;m not sure I&#39;ve ever read &#39;Of&#39; as an accented beat, but I&#39;d be interested in hearing if anyone else has.  </div>

<div> </div><div>I&#39;ve followed this thread with great interest.  Over the course of the last day or so, a couple of questions have come to mind, and I hope you&#39;ll excuse a graduate student&#39;s ignorance if they&#39;re silly: were there any early modern theories in place that suggested that metrical substitutions carried particular significance?  Or were substitutions looked at as acceptable (but insignificant) deviances from a standard model?  I know that there was a good deal of substitution in Latin dactylic hexameter (except, for the most part, on the fifth foot), but I have no clue what people believed in the early modern period.  These questions come up as I recall a passage from PL where the meter falls to pieces for half a dozen lines or so; I remember this being somehow connected to the sense of the narrative description (I don&#39;t believe it was a speech).  If anyone on the list could give direction on this matter, I&#39;d appreciate it.  </div>

<div> </div><div>Best,</div><div> </div><div>Ben Moran</div><div>The University of Alabama</div></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><br><div class="gmail_quote"><div><div class="h5">On Sun, Sep 15, 2013 at 2:46 PM, James Rovira <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:jamesrovira@gmail.com" target="_blank">jamesrovira@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>

</div></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div><div class="h5"><div dir="ltr">I know very little about Early Modern poetics to be sure -- so I very much appreciate your responses -- but even reading line 1 today, I would say that &quot;first&quot; could reasonably be demoted because a stressed syllable precedes and follows it. That particular case is both performance and convention, I would say. I like Richard&#39;s stress on &quot;Of&quot; because it&#39;s the opening word of an epic, so that applies even more pressure to demote &quot;first.&quot; <div>


<br></div><div>The word &quot;society&quot; was only brought up in a hypothetical example of yours, was it not? In that case I trust your statement about EM convention and practice -- thank you. </div><div><br></div><div>


Jim R<div><br><div class="gmail_extra"><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Sun, Sep 15, 2013 at 3:35 PM, J. Michael Gillum <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:mgillum@ret.unca.edu" target="_blank">mgillum@ret.unca.edu</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>


<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;padding-left:1ex;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-width:1px;border-left-style:solid"><div dir="ltr">James--the issue I addressed with Richard could be framed in terms of metrical convention. Did Milton think iambic verse conventions allowed a beat to be realized in the third syllable position in the pattern x//xx? Or did conventions of performance require that the natural stress on the word &quot;first&quot; be overridden and the beat realized on &quot;dis-&quot;?</div>


<div><div>
<div class="gmail_extra"><br></div></div></div></blockquote></div>
</div></div></div></div>
<br></div></div><div class="im">_______________________________________________<br>
Milton-L mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu" target="_blank">Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu</a><br>
Manage your list membership and access list archives at <a href="http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l" target="_blank">http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l</a><br>
<br>
Milton-L web site: <a href="http://johnmilton.org/" target="_blank">http://johnmilton.org/</a><br></div></blockquote></div><br></div>
<br>_______________________________________________<br>
Milton-L mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu">Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu</a><br>
Manage your list membership and access list archives at <a href="http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l" target="_blank">http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l</a><br>
<br>
Milton-L web site: <a href="http://johnmilton.org/" target="_blank">http://johnmilton.org/</a><br></blockquote></div><br></div>