<html dir="ltr">
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
<style type="text/css" id="owaParaStyle"></style>
</head>
<body fpstyle="1" ocsi="0">
<div style="direction: ltr;font-family: Arial;color: #000000;font-size: 10pt;">In my old-fashioned terminology, to see a stress on &quot;first&quot; would make the second metrical unit a spondee, not a trochee, since the first syllable of &quot;disobedience&quot; involves what
 I would call dictionary or inherent stress (non-negotiable, in other words). &nbsp;<br>
<div><br>
<div style="font-family:Tahoma; font-size:13px">
<div style="font-family:Tahoma; font-size:13px">
<div style="font-family:Tahoma; font-size:13px">RS </div>
</div>
</div>
</div>
<div style="font-family: Times New Roman; color: #000000; font-size: 16px">
<hr tabindex="-1">
<div id="divRpF999978" style="direction: ltr; "><font face="Tahoma" size="2" color="#000000"><b>From:</b> milton-l-bounces@lists.richmond.edu [milton-l-bounces@lists.richmond.edu] on behalf of J. Michael Gillum [mgillum@ret.unca.edu]<br>
<b>Sent:</b> Sunday, September 15, 2013 3:30 PM<br>
<b>To:</b> John Milton Discussion List<br>
<b>Subject:</b> Re: [Milton-L] Scansion and line 1<br>
</font><br>
</div>
<div></div>
<div>
<div dir="ltr">Richard--those are good comments. If you meant &quot;seeing-as&quot; to be directed by metrical understanding, then that's pretty much what I meant by &quot;counting-as.&quot; However, I'd emphasize that we don't need to say or hear &quot;heav'n&quot; as a monosyllable. We
 register that it counts as one syllable to satisfy the metrical scheme.
<div><br>
</div>
<div>In my understanding of the i.p. line, which is about the same as Attridge's, readers and performers should register five beats arranged in a limited range of patterns such as x/x/ , xx//, and /xx/. All of these count as satisfying iambicity (the mature
 convention) but they are not all seen or heard as alternating in the primitive iambic pattern. So a metrically-savvy reader could interpret passages like &quot;man's first dis-&quot; in more than one way, owing to the limited stress contrasts. One could further ask
 whether a particular poet's metrical set allows a particular feature such as &quot;second position trochee.&quot; For Pope, no; for Milton, yes. So I am free to interpret the rhythm as x//xx/x/x/, and to me it sounds better, makes more sense than the other way. I also
 like that it is an unusual rhythm, a bold move.</div>
<div><br>
</div>
<div>I agree that &quot;meter is an independent variable&quot; and scansion should not merely reflect a first impression of how we would say it. Meter suggests one or more ways that the poet may have wanted it to be said. You are emphasizing the &quot;one,&quot; while I am emphasizing
 the &quot;or more.&quot;<br>
<div><br>
</div>
<div><br>
</div>
</div>
</div>
<div class="gmail_extra"><br>
<br>
<div class="gmail_quote">On Sun, Sep 15, 2013 at 2:59 PM, Richard A. Strier <span dir="ltr">
&lt;<a href="mailto:rastrier@uchicago.edu" target="_blank">rastrier@uchicago.edu</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex; border-left:1px #ccc solid; padding-left:1ex">
<div>
<div style="direction:ltr; font-size:10pt; font-family:Arial">Michael-- &quot;seeing as&quot; and &quot;counting as&quot; seem to me to be identical in this context. &nbsp;To see something in a particular way in the metrical context is to count it in that way.<br>
<div><br>
<div style="font-family:Tahoma; font-size:13px">
<div style="font-family:Tahoma; font-size:13px">
<div style="font-family:Tahoma; font-size:13px">I see the point you are making about the second foot in line 1 (I am not convinced that we should not speak of metrical feet), but I am not so sure about &quot;sense-required&quot; accents. &nbsp;Seems to me that that way madness
 lies, since there are all sorts of arguments why almost any particular word is semantically/conceptually important, and so to take such arguments into account, in doing scansion, would yield no metrical system. &nbsp;In my view, part of the point of meter in poetry
 is to be (largely) independent of semantics. &nbsp;If the two always overlap, one could never learn anything about a line from the meter, since you would only be reading for sense. &nbsp;Whereas it seems to me that reading line one as regular gives an interesting emphasis
 on DIS, one that does make one think of the line somewhat differently. &nbsp;I hope that I am making myself clear (i.e. meter is most important in poetry as an independent variable).
</div>
<div style="font-family:Tahoma; font-size:13px"><br>
</div>
</div>
</div>
</div>
<div style="font-size:16px; font-family:Times New Roman">
<hr>
<div style="direction:ltr"><font face="Tahoma" color="#000000"><b>From:</b> <a href="mailto:milton-l-bounces@lists.richmond.edu" target="_blank">
milton-l-bounces@lists.richmond.edu</a> [<a href="mailto:milton-l-bounces@lists.richmond.edu" target="_blank">milton-l-bounces@lists.richmond.edu</a>] on behalf of J. Michael Gillum [<a href="mailto:mgillum@ret.unca.edu" target="_blank">mgillum@ret.unca.edu</a>]<br>
<b>Sent:</b> Sunday, September 15, 2013 1:44 PM<br>
<b>To:</b> John Milton Discussion List<br>
<b>Subject:</b> Re: [Milton-L] &quot;then&quot; not &quot;[then]&quot;<br>
</font><br>
</div>
<div></div>
<div>
<div dir="ltr">James Rovira: It doesn't matter whether anyone pronounced &quot;society&quot; as a trisyllable, though I guess some did. It's a matter of
<i>counting-as</i>, which may be slightly distinct from Richard's &quot;seeing-as&quot; or even hearing-as. Long established in the code of accentual-syllabic versification was the rule (or liberty) that adjacent vowel sounds or those separated by W, V, etc. can count
 as either two syllables or (by elision) one, according to what the meter wants. This rule may be rooted in variances in actual pronunciation (violet or vy-let), but it is a metric rather than linguistic rule. &nbsp;I suspect no English speakers have actually pronounced
 a monosyllabic &quot;heav'n.&quot;
<div><br>
</div>
<div>Richard Strier: I agree that line 1 of PL <u>can</u> be seen as a regular alternating line, but I wouldn't be so sure that Milton said it that way. As you know, there are inversions of the expected stress profile every few lines, usually following rules
 / liberties established in the iambic tradition since Spenser. I know of no evidence as to how people of Milton's time pronounced these, but I suspect they respected natural stress contours within a chant-like performance that registered five beats to the
 line.</div>
<div><br>
</div>
<div>The big metrical issue about line 1 is the apparent &quot;second-position trochee&quot; (x//xx/x/x/ with the sense-required emphasis on &quot;first&quot;). These are unusual in the metrical tradition. Attridge, the leading metrical theorist whom Creaser generally follows,
 takes this feature as a sort of declaration of outlawry. That's &nbsp;a view I find attractive.</div>
<div><br>
</div>
<div>One of the Elizabethan metric theorists seems to have believed that stress inversions in the alternating line required the performer to mispronounce words to preserve the alternating meter. But those guys were used to very strict and regular iambic lines.</div>
<div><br>
</div>
</div>
<div class="gmail_extra"><br>
<br>
<div class="gmail_quote">On Sun, Sep 15, 2013 at 12:11 PM, Richard A. Strier <span dir="ltr">
&lt;<a href="mailto:rastrier@uchicago.edu" target="_blank">rastrier@uchicago.edu</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex; border-left:1px #ccc solid; padding-left:1ex">
<div>
<div style="direction:ltr; font-size:10pt; font-family:Arial">I think Michael Gillum's post, building on John Leonard's, settles the matter. &nbsp;BUT I do think that sophisticated poets (Jonson, Herbert, Milton, etc, etc) had a clear sense of the placement of accents
 as well as of numbers of syllables.
<div><br>
</div>
<div>Meter is a matter of what Wittgenstein would call &quot;seeing as.&quot; &nbsp;If one could/can find a way of seeing a line as (regular) iambic pentameter then it was/is iambic pentameter.</div>
<div><br>
</div>
<div>Take the first line of <i>PL</i>. &nbsp;It can be made into metrical heavy weather, but it can also easily be seen as perfectly regular iambic pentameter:</div>
<div><br>
</div>
<div>Of MANS first DISobeDIENCE [one syllable -- &quot;dgence&quot;], AND the FRUIT.</div>
<div><br>
</div>
<div>The caesura before &quot;and,&quot; as well as its metrical position allows for the stress (eliminating punctuation,  la Teskey us a giant mistake). &nbsp;I have no doubt that Milton wanted us to see the line as presented above, and to do the same sorts of operations
 with many others. &nbsp;Empirical linguistics (i.e. variations of stress/loudness) has virtually nothing to do with the matter of meter. &nbsp;Rhythm is another matter. &nbsp;And performance, of course, is yet another (meter is not meant as a guide to this, though it can,
 at times, be so). &nbsp;In line 1, for instance, I like the fact that &quot;and&quot; and &quot;fruit&quot; are, so to speak, left hanging in the line. &nbsp;But whether the line needs to be performed that way is an open question. &nbsp;It doesn't
<i>need</i> to be, though it certainly can be.</div>
<div>
<div><br>
<div style="font-family:Tahoma; font-size:13px">
<div style="font-family:Tahoma; font-size:13px">
<div style="font-family:Tahoma; font-size:13px">RS </div>
</div>
</div>
</div>
<div style="font-size:16px; font-family:Times New Roman">
<hr>
<div style="direction:ltr"><font face="Tahoma" color="#000000"><b>From:</b> <a href="mailto:milton-l-bounces@lists.richmond.edu" target="_blank">
milton-l-bounces@lists.richmond.edu</a> [<a href="mailto:milton-l-bounces@lists.richmond.edu" target="_blank">milton-l-bounces@lists.richmond.edu</a>] on behalf of J. Michael Gillum [<a href="mailto:mgillum@ret.unca.edu" target="_blank">mgillum@ret.unca.edu</a>]<br>
<b>Sent:</b> Sunday, September 15, 2013 10:39 AM
<div><br>
<b>To:</b> John Milton Discussion List<br>
</div>
<b>Subject:</b> Re: [Milton-L] &quot;then&quot; not &quot;[then]&quot;<br>
</font><br>
</div>
<div>
<div>
<div></div>
<div>
<div dir="ltr">Syllable count is the most salient feature in early modern English metric theory. Sidney names the meters as &quot;our line of ten syllables,&quot; &quot;our line of eleven syllables&quot; etc. Many writers did not have a clear conceptual grasp (as opposed to a
 functional grasp) of metrical accent, but anybody can count syllables, as Pope complains. It is overwhelmingly probable that the printer dropped a word when setting the &quot;they then&quot; line first edition and that Milton would have chosen to correct it in an epic
 (as opposed to dramatic) text. So I agree with John that we should not consider this to be an emendation.
<div><br>
</div>
<div>As to the supposed twelve-syllable lines-- &quot;Ta dum ta dum ta dum ta dum society&quot; would be a hexameter in a hexameter context, or a pentameter in a pentameter context. The last syllable would be (or count as) a weak sixth beat in the hexameter, or a doesn't-count
 extra offbeat (feminine ending) in the pentameter. &quot;Society&quot; would count as four syllables in the hexameter and three syllables in the pentameter, by actual or theoretical elision of I and E. In the context of PL, the line is a pentameter. Obviously, the &quot;satiety&quot;
 line is the same case.</div>
</div>
<div class="gmail_extra"><br>
<br>
<div class="gmail_quote">On Sun, Sep 15, 2013 at 10:57 AM, Nancy Charlton <span dir="ltr">
&lt;<a href="mailto:charltonwordorder1@gmail.com" target="_blank">charltonwordorder1@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex; border-left:1px #ccc solid; padding-left:1ex">
<div dir="auto">
<div>Yes, that is certainly possible. I have no access to the 1667, so assumed that [then] in brackets was an emendation. If it looks like a duck...</div>
<div>
<div><br>
</div>
<div>Nancy Charlton<br>
<br>
Sent from my iPhone</div>
</div>
<div>
<div>
<div><br>
On Sep 15, 2013, at 6:37 AM, John K Leonard &lt;<a href="mailto:jleonard@uwo.ca" target="_blank">jleonard@uwo.ca</a>&gt; wrote:<br>
<br>
</div>
<blockquote type="cite">
<div>
<div>Emendation? It is true that &quot;then&quot; in 10.827 does not appear in the first edition (1667), but it does appear in the second (1674), so&nbsp;a case can be made for seeing it as&nbsp;Milton's correction of a printer's error rather than a Bentleyan emendation of an
 expressive omission.</div>
<div>&nbsp;</div>
<div>John Leonard </div>
<div>&nbsp;</div>
<span>On 09/15/13, <b>Nancy Charlton </b>&lt;<a href="mailto:charltonwordorder1@gmail.com" target="_blank">charltonwordorder1@gmail.com</a>&gt; wrote:<u></u>
<blockquote type="cite" style="padding-left:13px; margin-left:0px; border-left:#00f 1px solid">
<div><span>
<p></p>
<table>
<tbody>
<tr>
<td>
<p></p>
<div>I was thinking the same thing, except I would liken it to a quarter-rest in music, with perhaps a fermata on &quot;me&quot;. This to me has better rhetorical logic, particularly if the line is left stark without the emendation &quot;then.&quot;</div>
<div><br>
</div>
<div>Nancy Charlton&nbsp;<br>
<br>
Sent from my iPhone</div>
<div><br>
On Sep 14, 2013, at 8:32 PM, &quot;Salwa Khoddam&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:skhoddam@cox.net" target="_blank">skhoddam@cox.net</a>&gt; wrote:<br>
<br>
</div>
<blockquote type="cite">
<div>
<div><font face="Arial">But how can these nine-syllable lines be scanned as unmetrical?? If we include pauses when they are spoken, it seems to me they scan quite regularly. For instance, a pause after the question mark in this line (10.827).</font></div>
<div><font face="Arial">Salwa</font></div>
<div>Salwa Khoddam PhD<br>
Professor of English Emerita<br>
Oklahoma City University<br>
<a href="mailto:skhoddam@cox.net" target="_blank">skhoddam@cox.net</a></div>
<blockquote style="padding-left:5px; margin-left:5px; border-left:#000000 2px solid; padding-right:0px; margin-right:0px">
<div style="font:10pt arial">----- Original Message ----- </div>
<div style="background:#e4e4e4; font:10pt arial"><b>From:</b> <a href="mailto:Gregory.Machacek@marist.edu" target="_blank">
Gregory Machacek</a> </div>
<div style="font:10pt arial"><b>To:</b> <a href="mailto:milton-l@lists.richmond.edu" target="_blank">
John Milton Discussion List</a> </div>
<div style="font:10pt arial"><b>Sent:</b> Saturday, September 14, 2013 5:32 PM</div>
<div style="font:10pt arial"><b>Subject:</b> Re: [Milton-L] Query on scansion</div>
<div><br>
</div>
<font face="Default Sans Serif,Verdana,Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif">
<div>With me? How can they [then] acquitted stand (10.827)<br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
Greg Machacek<br>
Professor of English<br>
Marist College</div>
<br>
<br>
<font color="#990099"><a href="mailto:-----milton-l-bounces@lists.richmond.edu" target="_blank">-----milton-l-bounces@lists.richmond.edu</a> wrote: -----</font>
<div style="padding-left:5px">
<div style="padding-left:5px; border-left:black 2px solid; padding-right:0px">To: John Milton Discussion List &lt;<a href="mailto:milton-l@lists.richmond.edu" target="_blank">milton-l@lists.richmond.edu</a>&gt;<br>
From: JCarl Bellinger <u></u><br>
Sent by: <a href="mailto:milton-l-bounces@lists.richmond.edu" target="_blank">milton-l-bounces@lists.richmond.edu</a><br>
Date: 09/14/2013 04:12PM<br>
Subject: Re: [Milton-L] Query on scansion<br>
<br>
<p dir="ltr">I don't recall who made the observation but a line of just nine syllables, a truncated line, appears just where Eve suggests to Adam they might choose to remain childless in order to limit to their own persons the Woe otherwise destined now for
 all generations of their progeny.</p>
<p dir="ltr">Perhaps someone could locate the line (I'm away from my desk at the moment)...<br>
I think that not a few editions of PL have rejected the nine syllable line as unmetrical, which it most certainly is, and have replaced it with a line that will scan.<br>
-Carl<br>
</p>
<div><font size="3" face="Courier New,Courier,monospace">_______________________________________________<br>
Milton-L mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu" target="_blank">Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu</a><br>
Manage your list membership and access list archives at <a href="http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l" target="_blank">
http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l</a><br>
<br>
Milton-L web site: <a href="http://johnmilton.org/" target="_blank">http://johnmilton.org/</a></font></div>
<u></u></div>
</div>
<div></div>
</font>
<p></p>
<hr>
<p></p>
_______________________________________________<br>
Milton-L mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu" target="_blank">Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu</a><br>
Manage your list membership and access list archives at <a href="http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l" target="_blank">
http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l</a><br>
<br>
Milton-L web site: <a href="http://johnmilton.org/" target="_blank">http://johnmilton.org/</a></blockquote>
</div>
</blockquote>
<blockquote type="cite">
<div><span>_______________________________________________</span><br>
<span>Milton-L mailing list</span><br>
<span><a href="mailto:Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu" target="_blank">Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu</a></span><br>
<span>Manage your list membership and access list archives at <a href="http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l" target="_blank">
http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l</a></span><br>
<span></span><br>
<span>Milton-L web site: <a href="http://johnmilton.org/" target="_blank">http://johnmilton.org/</a></span></div>
</blockquote>
</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
</span>
<p></p>
</div>
</blockquote>
<div>&nbsp;</div>
</span></div>
</blockquote>
<blockquote type="cite">
<div><span>_______________________________________________</span><br>
<span>Milton-L mailing list</span><br>
<span><a href="mailto:Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu" target="_blank">Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu</a></span><br>
<span>Manage your list membership and access list archives at <a href="http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l" target="_blank">
http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l</a></span><br>
<span></span><br>
<span>Milton-L web site: <a href="http://johnmilton.org/" target="_blank">http://johnmilton.org/</a></span></div>
</blockquote>
</div>
</div>
</div>
<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
Milton-L mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu" target="_blank">Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu</a><br>
Manage your list membership and access list archives at <a href="http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l" target="_blank">
http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l</a><br>
<br>
Milton-L web site: <a href="http://johnmilton.org/" target="_blank">http://johnmilton.org/</a><br>
</blockquote>
</div>
<br>
</div>
</div>
</div>
</div>
</div>
</div>
</div>
</div>
<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
Milton-L mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu" target="_blank">Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu</a><br>
Manage your list membership and access list archives at <a href="http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l" target="_blank">
http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l</a><br>
<br>
Milton-L web site: <a href="http://johnmilton.org/" target="_blank">http://johnmilton.org/</a><br>
</blockquote>
</div>
<br>
</div>
</div>
</div>
</div>
</div>
<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
Milton-L mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu" target="_blank">Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu</a><br>
Manage your list membership and access list archives at <a href="http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l" target="_blank">
http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l</a><br>
<br>
Milton-L web site: <a href="http://johnmilton.org/" target="_blank">http://johnmilton.org/</a><br>
</blockquote>
</div>
<br>
</div>
</div>
</div>
</div>
</body>
</html>