<div dir="ltr">The author of <i>The Discarded Image</i> would know that one could appropriately thank the stars for an ability, although his Hermit might place the credit elsewhere..<div><br></div><div style>The expression is so mechanical in English that I&#39;m not sure it ever registered on me as implying a theory of causation. &quot;Thank <b>my</b> stars&quot; seems to be more common than &quot;thank <b>the</b> stars&quot; once you go back before 1800. &quot;My stars!&quot; used to be a common exclamation of surprise or alarm in American English. </div>
</div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Wed, Jul 31, 2013 at 1:09 PM, Dario Rivarossa <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:dario.rivarossa@gmail.com" target="_blank">dario.rivarossa@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">&gt;And thanks for Dario for providing us with Italian sources on this topic.<br>
<br>
Just luck, being born here ;-) but honestly it&#39;s the only lucky side in this.<br>
<br>
But here&#39;s a counter-evidence: in the Prince Caspian episode, Lucy<br>
&quot;thanks the stars&quot; for having the right ability in the right moment.<br>
Just a figure of speech, or . . . ?<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
Milton-L mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu">Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu</a><br>
Manage your list membership and access list archives at <a href="http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l" target="_blank">http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l</a><br>
<br>
Milton-L web site: <a href="http://johnmilton.org/" target="_blank">http://johnmilton.org/</a><br>
</blockquote></div><br></div>