<html>
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=us-ascii">
</head>
<body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: 16px; font-family: Calibri, sans-serif; ">
<div>
<div>
<div>Dear scholars,</div>
<div><br>
</div>
<div>I have read every article and chapter on &quot;To Cyriack Skinner upon his Blindness&quot; that I could get my hands on and am working through the tone of lines 6-9:</div>
<div><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre"></span>Yet I argue not</div>
<div>Against Heaven's hand or will, nor bate a jot</div>
<div>Of heart of hope; but sill bear up and steer</div>
<div>Right onward. What supports me dost thou ask?</div>
<div><br>
</div>
<div>Many editors note the revisions to the poem, including replacing &quot;Uphillward&quot; with &quot;Right onward.&quot; In addition to more clearly initiating the sense of traveling/sailing &nbsp;that other elements of the poem produce, &quot;Right onward&quot; sounds to me as purposefully
 trite, more along the lines of Milton's reference to the &quot;fatal and perfidious bark&quot; in &quot;Lycidas,&quot; a trite explanation called in to be ultimately rejected. I see the four aspirated &quot;h&quot; sounds in the first halves of lines 7 and 8 as contributing to that tone.&nbsp;</div>
<div><br>
</div>
<div>What are your thoughts? Many thanks.</div>
<div><br>
</div>
<div>
<div>Adios,</div>
<div>Angelica Duran</div>
<div>Associate Professor, English and Comparative Literature</div>
<div>Director, Religious Studies</div>
<div>Purdue University</div>
<div>500 Oval Drive - Heavilon Hall</div>
<div>West Lafayette, Indiana 47907</div>
<div>U.S.A.</div>
<div>(765) 496-3957</div>
<div>&lt;duran0@purdue.edu&gt;</div>
<div>&lt;http://www.cla.purdue.edu/complit/directory/?personid=80&gt;</div>
<div>&lt;http://www.cla.purdue.edu/religious-studies/&gt;</div>
<div><br>
</div>
</div>
</div>
</div>
</body>
</html>