<html xmlns:v="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:vml" xmlns:o="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" xmlns:w="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:word" xmlns:m="http://schemas.microsoft.com/office/2004/12/omml" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40"><head><meta http-equiv=Content-Type content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-2"><meta name=Generator content="Microsoft Word 12 (filtered medium)"><style><!--
/* Font Definitions */
@font-face
        {font-family:"Cambria Math";
        panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4;}
@font-face
        {font-family:Calibri;
        panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4;}
@font-face
        {font-family:Tahoma;
        panose-1:2 11 6 4 3 5 4 4 2 4;}
@font-face
        {font-family:"Segoe UI";
        panose-1:2 11 5 2 4 2 4 2 2 3;}
/* Style Definitions */
p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal
        {mso-margin-top-alt:auto;
        margin-right:0cm;
        mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto;
        margin-left:0cm;
        font-size:12.0pt;
        font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";
        mso-believe-normal-left:yes;}
a:link, span.MsoHyperlink
        {mso-style-priority:99;
        color:blue;
        text-decoration:underline;}
a:visited, span.MsoHyperlinkFollowed
        {mso-style-priority:99;
        color:purple;
        text-decoration:underline;}
span.E-mailStlus17
        {mso-style-type:personal-reply;
        font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";
        color:#1F497D;}
.MsoChpDefault
        {mso-style-type:export-only;
        font-size:10.0pt;}
@page WordSection1
        {size:612.0pt 792.0pt;
        margin:70.85pt 70.85pt 70.85pt 70.85pt;}
div.WordSection1
        {page:WordSection1;}
--></style><![if mso 9]><style>p.MsoNormal
        {margin-left:3.0pt;}
</style><![endif]><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>
<o:shapedefaults v:ext="edit" spidmax="1026" />
</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>
<o:shapelayout v:ext="edit">
<o:idmap v:ext="edit" data="1" />
</o:shapelayout></xml><![endif]--></head><body lang=HU link=blue vlink=purple style='margin-left:3.0pt;margin-top:3.0pt;margin-right:3.0pt;margin-bottom:.75pt'><div class=WordSection1><p class=MsoNormal><span lang=EN-US style='font-size:11.0pt;font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";color:#1F497D'>I think I should clarify my question. What I am interested in, is not the meaning or the etymology of the two expressions (my apology for asking &#8222;stem for&#8221;), but the origin, as in who used it first, if it is possible to know at all? An oral tradition infiltrating that of the written, sure, but can one pinpoint  when this infiltration took place? The reason I ask this, is that in Remembering Milton, the expression (Miltonoclasts) is in inverted commas suggesting either a citation or a pejorative undertone. I wasn&#8217;t quite sure what to think of it, as both expression popped up quite liberally in publications on Milton, and was hoping that someone from this list could help me out. Curiosity killing the cat :)<o:p></o:p></span></p><p class=MsoNormal><span lang=EN-US style='font-size:11.0pt;font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";color:#1F497D'>Bests,<o:p></o:p></span></p><p class=MsoNormal><span lang=EN-US style='font-size:11.0pt;font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";color:#1F497D'>Larisa Kocic-Zambo<o:p></o:p></span></p><p class=MsoNormal><span style='font-size:11.0pt;font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";color:#1F497D'><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p><div><div style='border:none;border-top:solid #B5C4DF 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 0cm 0cm 0cm'><p class=MsoNormal style='margin:0cm;margin-bottom:.0001pt'><b><span style='font-size:10.0pt;font-family:"Tahoma","sans-serif"'>From:</span></b><span style='font-size:10.0pt;font-family:"Tahoma","sans-serif"'> Harold Skulsky [mailto:hskulsky@smith.edu] <br><b>Sent:</b> Sunday, February 13, 2011 9:18 PM<br><b>To:</b> milton-l@lists.richmond.edu<br><b>Subject:</b> Re: [Milton-L] Mitonoclasts vs Miltonolatres<o:p></o:p></span></p></div></div><p class=MsoNormal><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p><div><p class=MsoNormal style='margin:0cm;margin-bottom:.0001pt'><span style='font-size:10.0pt;font-family:"Segoe UI","sans-serif"'>&quot;Miltonolater&quot; is a barbarism (that is, a modern hybrid coinage, no doubt by an affected &nbsp;pedant of questionable wit or even more questionable hellenicity) combining a non-Gk name and the classical Gk &quot;latris&quot; meaning (in this context) &quot;worshiper,&quot; on the analogy of &quot;idolater&quot; (Gk. &quot;eidololatres&quot;). <o:p></o:p></span></p></div><div><p class=MsoNormal style='margin:0cm;margin-bottom:.0001pt'><span style='font-size:10.0pt;font-family:"Segoe UI","sans-serif"'>&nbsp;<o:p></o:p></span></p></div><div><p class=MsoNormal style='margin:0cm;margin-bottom:.0001pt'><span style='font-size:10.0pt;font-family:"Segoe UI","sans-serif"'>&quot;Miltonoclast&quot; is a parallel formation combining the same non-Gk name with Gk. &quot;klastes&quot; meaning &quot;breaker,&quot; on the analogy of &quot;iconoclast,&quot; a Patristic Gk. term meaning &quot;one who shatters [devotional] images.&quot;<o:p></o:p></span></p></div><div><p class=MsoNormal style='margin:0cm;margin-bottom:.0001pt'><span style='font-size:10.0pt;font-family:"Segoe UI","sans-serif"'>&nbsp;<o:p></o:p></span></p></div><div><p class=MsoNormal style='margin:0cm;margin-bottom:.0001pt'><span style='font-size:10.0pt;font-family:"Segoe UI","sans-serif"'>The conceit is that a person who meets the former description treats Milton virtually as an object of heathen worship --&nbsp;less as&nbsp;a god than as the graven image of one; whereas a person who meets the latter description makes it her business to treat Milton as the imperfect&nbsp;being he was. <o:p></o:p></span></p></div><div><p class=MsoNormal style='margin:0cm;margin-bottom:.0001pt'><span style='font-size:10.0pt;font-family:"Segoe UI","sans-serif"'>&nbsp;<o:p></o:p></span></p></div><div><p class=MsoNormal style='margin:0cm;margin-bottom:.0001pt'><span style='font-size:10.0pt;font-family:"Segoe UI","sans-serif"'>For what it's worth, this writer's humble advice about the underlying controversy is to beware of false&nbsp;choices.<o:p></o:p></span></p></div></div></body></html>