<html><body bgcolor="#FFFFFF"><div>To descend to a wikipedia-level answer, Klopstock wrote an epic poem on the subject of redemption titled Messias and had met the person who translated Milton into German. &nbsp;Nietzsche's linking of the two seems sensible. &nbsp;I'm surprised Nietzsche wasn't more interested in Milton's Satan, but it's possible the Romantics had already done his work for him.&nbsp;<br><br>James Rovira<div><br></div></div><div><br><br></div><blockquote type="cite"><div><div style="font-family:times new roman, new york, times, serif;font-size:12pt"><div>
<div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="-webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(26, 26, 26, 0.296875); -webkit-composition-fill-color: rgba(175, 192, 227, 0.230469); -webkit-composition-frame-color: rgba(77, 128, 180, 0.230469); ">[My quick translation] <i>Beyond his borders</i>-- When an artist wants to be more than an artist, for example the moral Awakener of his people, so he falls in love, as punishment, with a monster of moral materials--and the muse laughs at that: then this so kind-hearted goddess can also become spiteful with jealousy. One only has to think on Milton and Klopstock.</span><br></div></div></div></div></blockquote></body></html>