<html><head><style type="text/css"><!-- DIV {margin:0px;} --></style></head><body><div style="font-family:bookman old style, new york, times, serif;font-size:12pt"><DIV>Upon reflection, I recall blogging on "eating death":</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><A href="http://gypsyscholarship.blogspot.com/2006/08/and-knew-not-eating-death.html">http://gypsyscholarship.blogspot.com/2006/08/and-knew-not-eating-death.html</A></DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>Jeffery Hodges<BR></DIV>
<DIV>
<DIV style="FONT-SIZE: 12pt; FONT-FAMILY: bookman old style, new york, times, serif"><BR>
<DIV style="FONT-SIZE: 12pt; FONT-FAMILY: times new roman, new york, times, serif"><FONT face=Tahoma size=2>
<HR SIZE=1>
<B><SPAN style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold">From:</SPAN></B> Ernst Oor &lt;eoor@planet.nl&gt;<BR><B><SPAN style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold">To:</SPAN></B> John Milton Discussion List &lt;milton-l@lists.richmond.edu&gt;<BR><B><SPAN style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold">Sent:</SPAN></B> Wed, July 21, 2010 11:00:24 PM<BR><B><SPAN style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold">Subject:</SPAN></B> [Milton-L] Milton's artistry<BR></FONT><BR>
<STYLE></STYLE>

<DIV>Dear List Members,</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>Some time ago the list members discussed poetry&nbsp;and &nbsp;art in connection with the various interpretations of some passages in <EM>Paradise Lost</EM>.</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>I am reading <STRONG>Kenneth Haynes</STRONG> book<EM> English Literature and Ancient Languages&nbsp; </EM>(Oxford University Press,&nbsp;2003) and on p. 79 of his book Haynes gives a scholarly explanation showing, in my opinion, Milton's artistry.</DIV>
<DIV>I quote:</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Take a famous grecism from <EM>Paradise Lost</EM>. Eve plucks the fruit, eats </DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; (9.791-2):</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Greedily she ingorg'd without restraint,</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;And knew not eating Death:</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Greek may use a participle after verbs of knowledge or perception, </DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; and the line, modelled after greek, means 'and knew not that she</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; ate Death'. But the unusual syntax is not limited&nbsp;to its Greek model;</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; rather it concentrates several meanings in the line: Eve did not know</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; (that is, she was ignorant for the last time) <EM>while</EM> she was eating </DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; death; she did not know <EM>what</EM> she did (she ate death); she did not </DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; know the <EM>eating</EM>, devouring power of death...&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <EM>[further&nbsp;down]&nbsp;</EM></DIV>
<DIV><EM></EM>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; His [Milton's] most powerful writing insists on the loss of paradise, to</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; prevent paradise even&nbsp;from being imagined, except on condition of its</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; imminent loss. Imitations of Greek and Latin syntax and vocabulary</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; provided Milton with one means to accomplish this...</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>Though Haynes'&nbsp;book is not about Milton, his poetry is often discussed&nbsp;and the book may be interesting&nbsp;to &nbsp;Milton scholars who have not yet read it.</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>Best regards,</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>Enna Martina.</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></div></body></html>