<div class="gmail_quote"><div>Jim, Jeffery --</div><div><br></div><div>many thanks. So, seems like your answers confirm what I suspected, i.e. that a view including both chaos AND universe together belonged ONLY to pre-Christian poets and writers. Milton, again, proves to be an outsider. Or, doesn&#39;t he?<br>
</div><div><br></div><div>D</div><div><br></div><div><br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
Hesiod&#39;s Theogony implies the existence of Chaos as a character in a drama<br>
rather than just a mass of disorganized matter that is later organized, but,<br>
as in Milton, it seems to be spoken of as a place as well.  For that matter,<br>
the earth comes into existence alongside of Chaos rather than out of it.<br>
<br>
Jim R<br>
<br>
<br>
Don&#39;t the atomists also have a sort of chaos, i.e., the atoms and the void, at the same time as multiple &#39;worlds&#39; engendered by the swerve in the falling atoms?</blockquote><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">

Jeffery Hodges<br></blockquote></div><br>