O&#39;Connor seems an orthodox enough Roman Catholic, and believed that her own writing was possible because her doctrine gave her a way of seeing things.  It&#39;s very doubtful to me that the capacity for creative imagination is linked to specific belief in any direct way -- O&#39;Connor would probably have been a great writer if she were an atheist or a Muslim.  The true irony is that she&#39;s hailed as an orthodox Christian by Evangelicals but wouldn&#39;t be allowed to teach at many Evangelical colleges in the US because she is Catholic.  O&#39;Connor would be denied a teaching position at Wheaton even though she is beloved by Evangelical Christian scholars.  I&#39;m curious if she&#39;d get hired at Baylor.<br>
<br>Jim R<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Thu, Jan 21, 2010 at 12:04 PM, Hannibal Hamlin <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:hamlin.hannibal@gmail.com">hamlin.hannibal@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
<div>The problem with all such value judgements is that they depend upon various definition arguments. From reading Flannery O&#39;Connor, for instance, I&#39;d be inclined to seriously question her &quot;orthodoxy.&quot; Indeed -- an idle thought -- might &quot;greatness&quot; and &quot;orthodoxy&quot; usually exist in writers in inverse proportion? But then of course &quot;greatness&quot; is even more difficult to define. And what, moreover, makes a writer &quot;religious&quot;? I&#39;d make a case for both Whitman and Dickinson as religious, though they were far from orthodox. Certainly great. I suppose we could even debate the parameters of &quot;American.&quot; What about T.S. Eliot?</div>


<div> </div>
<div>Hannibal</div><div><div></div><div class="h5">
<div> </div><br>
</div></div></blockquote></div>