Did Milton imply anywhere that nothing died before the fall?  My impression has always been that nothing had died -yet-.  <br><br>These lines seem to be a clear reference to the seasonal migration of birds -- wedge formation to ease their flight, caravan implying a long trip, which is taken high over the sea, etc:<br>
<br><font face="Lucida Grande"><span style="font-size: 13pt;">&lt;&lt;Part <span title="loosely">loosly</span> wing the Region, part more wise<span> [ 425 ]</span><br>In common, <a href="http://www.dartmouth.edu/%7Emilton/reading_room/pl/book_7/notes.shtml#geese" target="_blank"><span title="ranged">rang&#39;d</span> in figure wedge 
    <span title="their">thir</span> way</a>,<br>Intelligent of 
    seasons, and set forth<br><span title="Their">Thir</span> <span title="Airy">Aierie</span> Caravan high over <span title="Seas">Sea&#39;s</span><br>Flying, and over Lands with mutual 
    wing<br>Easing <span title="their">thir</span> flight; 
    &gt;&gt;<font size="2"><br><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Whatever we think about the importance of the specific issue, there does seem to be a clear contradiction between the seeming introduction of seasons in Book 10 and constant reference to it earlier.  I think just sheer curiosity about narrative detail would warrant some serious attention...  <br>
<br>Jim R </span></font> <br></span></font><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Wed, Jan 6, 2010 at 11:54 AM, John Leonard <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:jleonard@uwo.ca">jleonard@uwo.ca</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">




<div bgcolor="#ffffff">
<div><font face="Arial" size="2">&quot;Birth to death&quot;?   Surely this is to 
jump from the frying pan into the fire.  Having seasons before the Fall is 
troubling enough (when there was meant to be eternal Spring), but death. . . 
. <br></font></div></div></blockquote></div><br>