<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<HTML><HEAD>
<META content="text/html; charset=utf-8" http-equiv=Content-Type>
<META name=GENERATOR content="MSHTML 8.00.6001.18813">
<STYLE></STYLE>
</HEAD>
<BODY bgColor=#ffffff>
<DIV><FONT color=#000080 size=4 face=Sylfaen>Your question is an apt one, 
Jeffery. I haven't looked back over all the old posts to see (haven't time at 
the moment), but I don't recall anyone asserting or suggesting that Eve was 
"seeking temptation." (In fact, I believe that I said quite the opposite.) 
Indeed, she seeks "trial," in the sense of "testing," being "proven," to my mind 
(as I said earlier) in the firm belief that she is capable of withstanding 
whatever the Tempter can dish out. She makes the same mistake that Redcrosse 
makes with Error, and that Guyon makes in Mammon's Cave: that of underestimating 
the power of the foe, in this case, the Adversary of God. Milton's Samson errs 
similarly in thinking that he can withstand the power of Dagon--that it is he, 
and not God within him--who will defeat the fishy deity. The grandest failure of 
the type is of course Lucifer's, when he underestimates the power of the Son, 
first&nbsp;in the persona of&nbsp;the unfallen archangel, and again in the guise 
of the old man in the earthly desert. The Son, on the other hand, understands 
that it is the Father's power channeled through him that will defeat Satan, in 
the&nbsp;War in Heaven, in the wilderness, and&nbsp;on the pinnacle--and 
therefore he prevails.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=#000080 size=4 face=Sylfaen></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=#000080 size=4 face=Sylfaen>Best to all (and happy Labor 
Day),</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=#000080 size=4 face=Sylfaen></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=#000080 size=4 face=Sylfaen>Carol 
Barton</FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>