<table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="0" ><tr><td valign="top" style="font: inherit;"><DIV>I meant to write: "Upon reading (around <STRONG><EM><U>1995</U></EM></STRONG>)&nbsp;that review's&nbsp;excerpt "</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>Jeffery Hodges</DIV>
<DIV><BR>--- On <B>Wed, 4/1/09, Horace Jeffery Hodges <I>&lt;jefferyhodges@yahoo.com&gt;</I></B> wrote:<BR></DIV>
<BLOCKQUOTE style="PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: rgb(16,16,255) 2px solid"><BR>From: Horace Jeffery Hodges &lt;jefferyhodges@yahoo.com&gt;<BR>Subject: Re: [Milton-L] On Vergil/Milton and Pullman<BR>To: "John Milton Discussion List" &lt;milton-l@lists.richmond.edu&gt;<BR>Date: Wednesday, April 1, 2009, 3:56 PM<BR><BR>
<DIV id=yiv1200666986>
<TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 border=0>
<TBODY>
<TR>
<TD vAlign=top>
<DIV>David, I agree with you on Pullman.</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>Upon reading (around 2005)&nbsp;that review's&nbsp;excerpt (that I mentioned previously)&nbsp;describing the polar bear that could talk, I was intrigued. And at the beginning of Pullman's series, the style and story&nbsp;impressed me, and I still think that purely on the aesthetics of literary style, he far outdoes Rowling.</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>But so much of what he constructs in <EM>Dark Materials</EM> seems forced and even false. If&nbsp;Pullman had contented himself with telling a good story rather than attempting to out-wrestle Milton in&nbsp;the Bloomian sense of struggling with a "strong poet," he'd have succeeded in a better literary creation.</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>I also agree with you on Gaiman. As for Pratchett, I've read only the 'novel' that he wrote with Gaiman: <EM>Good Omens</EM>. A lot of Milton in that -- and a serious work even if done in fun. There's a lot to that ineffability argument...</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>Jeffery Hodges<BR><BR>--- On <B>Wed, 4/1/09, David Ainsworth <I>&lt;dainsworth@ua.edu&gt;</I></B> wrote:<BR></DIV>
<BLOCKQUOTE style="PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: rgb(16,16,255) 2px solid"><BR>From: David Ainsworth &lt;dainsworth@ua.edu&gt;<BR>Subject: Re: [Milton-L] On Vergil/Milton and Pullman<BR>To: "John Milton Discussion List" &lt;milton-l@lists.richmond.edu&gt;<BR>Date: Wednesday, April 1, 2009, 3:00 PM<BR><BR>
<DIV class=plainMail>Oddly enough, I think this discussion of Vergil and Milton best articulates my feelings about where Milton succeeds and Pullman fails. I found His Dark Materials to oversimplify Milton to the extent that it drew upon him, while the trilogy also managed to proceed indifferently along magical-realism paths as if ashamed of its genre.&nbsp; Where Vergil and Milton's epic poems both demonstrate their authors' skill within their chosen genre and offer their own critiques of its function and conventions, Pullman, I felt, wanted to critique but lacked consummate skill within the genre he chose.<BR><BR>Rowling may disavow knowledge of the genres inherent in her writing (or fantasy, at least--I'm not certain she ever depreciated the British school novel), but her writing demonstrates mastery of their tropes and techniques.<BR><BR>If pressed, I'd rather discuss echoes of Milton's work in writers like Gaiman or Pratchett over Pullman, however
 overt the latter is about Milton's influence upon him.&nbsp; The first two are revolutionaries within their genres in ways equatable to Vergil and Milton; the latter, I believe, is not.<BR><BR>David Ainsworth<BR><BR>Watt, James wrote:<BR>&gt; All Blessings on Dr. DiCesare for his kind response.&nbsp; I was, of course, exaggerating<BR>&gt; in my remarks and didn't (and don't) mean to suggest that either Vergil OR Milton<BR>&gt; are imperialist flacks or that they have any sympathies with Caesars (or Popes!).<BR>&gt; But both great men DID take pre-existent mythic accounts which both before and<BR>&gt; after them continue to be read by apologists for military glory and racial supremacy as celebrations of archetypal heroes of a sort quite antithetical to the teachings and<BR>&gt; practice of Jesus of Nazareth.&nbsp; Of course Milton's wonderful War in Heaven is a<BR>&gt; comic masterpiece subverting the entire process from Cain to Napoleon, from<BR>&gt;
 Achilles to Hitler.&nbsp; What I meant was that our Milton must have admired Vergil<BR>&gt; for his consummate mastery in destroying while seeming to preserve the Roman<BR>&gt; myth.&nbsp; His own practice, still only barely recognized, of making over a primitive<BR>&gt; and parochial 'creation myth into a thoroughgoing celebration of Christian humility<BR>&gt; is precisely the same kind of breath-taking performance.&nbsp; Oh, and Dr. DiCesare's<BR>&gt; book is, if you haven't read it, essential.&nbsp; Again, many thanks.<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; Jim Watt&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;________________________________________<BR>&gt; From: <A href="http://us.mc01g.mail.yahoo.com/mc/compose?to=milton-l-bounces@lists.richmond.edu" target=_blank rel=nofollow>milton-l-bounces@lists.richmond.edu</A> [<A href="http://us.mc01g.mail.yahoo.com/mc/compose?to=milton-l-bounces@lists.richmond.edu" target=_blank rel=nofollow>milton-l-bounces@lists.richmond.edu</A>] On Behalf Of Mario
 DiCesare [<A href="http://us.mc01g.mail.yahoo.com/mc/compose?to=dicesare1@mindspring.com" target=_blank rel=nofollow>dicesare1@mindspring.com</A>]<BR>&gt; Sent: Tuesday, March 31, 2009 4:13 PM<BR>&gt; To: John Milton Discussion List<BR>&gt; Subject: [Milton-L] On Vergil<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; Jim Watt's lively comment prompts some animadversions on Vergil and Rome, and some<BR>&gt; gentle modifications of his statement. While it is generally true that for most of<BR>&gt; the first 19 centuries after Vergil's death, he was thought to be a front man for<BR>&gt; Augustus, two important qualifications need to be made. First, throughout the ages,<BR>&gt; there have been vigorous dissenters from what seemed to be received opinion. (Craig<BR>&gt; Kallendorf, among others, has devoted a fair amount of space to studying some of<BR>&gt; them in recent years.) Second, the imperialist interpretation of "The Aeneid" has<BR>&gt; had a very rocky history in the last
 half-century and more.<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; Few Vergilian scholars and critics consider Vergil anything like a propagandist for<BR>&gt; Augustus any longer. That notion has been thoroughly discredited, at least in this<BR>&gt; country. Much was made for a time of an "optimistic" European school of criticism<BR>&gt; and a "pessimistic," mostly American school. Whatever the merits of such<BR>&gt; classification, the fact is that a host of first-rate scholar-critics have read the<BR>&gt; poem as quite other than a paean of praise for Augustus -- such as Wendell Clausen<BR>&gt; (of the so-called "Harvard School") and including such as Michael C. J. Putnam ("The<BR>&gt; Poetry of the Aeneid," 1965, and other works), Adam Parry, R. A. Brooks, R. D.<BR>&gt; Williams, A. J. Boyle, and Richard Thomas, among others. To these one should add<BR>&gt; Roland Austin, the distinguished British editor of several books of "The Aeneid"<BR>&gt; published by Oxford. Austin did
 not, I think, belong to any school, but his superb<BR>&gt; commentaries on individual books of "The Aeneid" reflect many of the same views.<BR>&gt; Parvulus inter magnos, I might also cite my own book on Vergil, which developed<BR>&gt; quite independently of the "Harvard School" from its first complete draft in 1963-64<BR>&gt; to its publication (Columbia UP, 1974).<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; It is difficult to think that Milton himself would have viewed Vergil as<BR>&gt; pro-Augustus; I know of no clear evidence on this question, but the spirit that<BR>&gt; animates "Paradise Lost" seems to me hardly distant from the spirit that animated<BR>&gt; Vergil's great critical poem.<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; Mario A. DiCesare<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; Watt, James wrote:<BR>&gt;&nbsp; &gt; .... If anything comes through P.L. for those of us (few certainly --and probably<BR>&gt; less likely to claim the 'fit' title) who love epic, it's that he truly loves
 his<BR>&gt; great mentor Virgil for his cheerful dedication&nbsp; to a hopeless task: acting as a<BR>&gt; P.R. man for a bloody crew of fascists, trying to put a positive spin on one of<BR>&gt; history's biggest land grabs by making the case for ROME (for Christ's sake! I am<BR>&gt; tempted to say anachronistically)!&nbsp; Working for Caesar is like trying to make Donald<BR>&gt; Trump into a benefactor of the Arts.&nbsp; But both our poets are true to something so<BR>&gt; much greater than their putative models; they make out of the mess of reality a<BR>&gt; glittering ideal --and so inspire their readers to doing the same in their own<BR>&gt; little lives, leaving something behind for their kids to believe in, something to<BR>&gt; help them survive the latest version (the one sold by political hacks and cynical<BR>&gt; priests) with their souls intact and their eyes on the stars....<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt;
 _______________________________________________<BR>&gt; Milton-L mailing list<BR>&gt; <A href="http://us.mc01g.mail.yahoo.com/mc/compose?to=Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu" target=_blank rel=nofollow>Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu</A><BR>&gt; Manage your list membership and access list archives at <A href="http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l" target=_blank rel=nofollow>http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l</A><BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; Milton-L web site: <A href="http://johnmilton.org/" target=_blank rel=nofollow>http://johnmilton.org/</A><BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; _______________________________________________<BR>&gt; Milton-L mailing list<BR>&gt; <A href="http://us.mc01g.mail.yahoo.com/mc/compose?to=Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu" target=_blank rel=nofollow>Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu</A><BR>&gt; Manage your list membership and access list archives at <A href="http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l" target=_blank
 rel=nofollow>http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l</A><BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; Milton-L web site: <A href="http://johnmilton.org/" target=_blank rel=nofollow>http://johnmilton.org/</A><BR>&gt; <BR><BR>_______________________________________________<BR>Milton-L mailing list<BR><A href="http://us.mc01g.mail.yahoo.com/mc/compose?to=Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu" target=_blank rel=nofollow>Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu</A><BR>Manage your list membership and access list archives at <A href="http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l" target=_blank rel=nofollow>http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l</A><BR><BR>Milton-L web site: <A href="http://johnmilton.org/" target=_blank rel=nofollow>http://johnmilton.org/</A><BR></DIV></BLOCKQUOTE></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></DIV><BR>-----Inline Attachment Follows-----<BR><BR>
<DIV class=plainMail>_______________________________________________<BR>Milton-L mailing list<BR><A href="http://us.mc01g.mail.yahoo.com/mc/compose?to=Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu" ymailto="mailto:Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu">Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu</A><BR>Manage your list membership and access list archives at <A href="http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l" target=_blank>http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l</A><BR><BR>Milton-L web site: <A href="http://johnmilton.org/" target=_blank>http://johnmilton.org/</A></DIV></BLOCKQUOTE></td></tr></table>