<div>Jim,</div>
<div>&nbsp;</div>
<div>Sure, and of course it&#39;s not &quot;blind&quot; trust, but still.&nbsp; I often find it annoying if a review is too much about the reviewer.&nbsp; No doubt you&#39;ve read, as I have, the kind of review, often by very senior scholars, that says little about the book in question, but rambles on self-indulgently about how important their own work has been or what they like or don&#39;t or anything that pops into their head.&nbsp; I also think this applies to the kind of negative review we all enjoy, but which is often totally uninformative.&nbsp; The best example here, safely away from Milton studies, is the restaurant reviewing of A. A. Gill.&nbsp; It&#39;s brilliant in its savage put-downs, and delightful to read, but hardly a guide to good cooking.</div>

<div>&nbsp;</div>
<div>Hannibal<br>&nbsp;</div>
<div>&nbsp;</div>
<div><span class="gmail_quote">On 12/12/08, <b class="gmail_sendername">James Rovira</b> &lt;<a href="mailto:jamesrovira@gmail.com">jamesrovira@gmail.com</a>&gt; wrote:</span>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="PADDING-LEFT: 1ex; MARGIN: 0px 0px 0px 0.8ex; BORDER-LEFT: #ccc 1px solid">Hannibal: <br><br>When you&#39;re reading a review of a book in your field, don&#39;t you feel you learn as much about the reviewer as you do the book being reviewed?&nbsp; I agree with you that there&#39;s no substitute for time spent reading in a field, but our reading of reviews is usually not a matter of blind trust in the reviewer. &nbsp; &nbsp; <br>
<br>Jim R &nbsp; <br>
<div><span class="e" id="q_11e2c7f39dcd8f73_1"><br>
<div class="gmail_quote">On Fri, Dec 12, 2008 at 11:14 AM, Hannibal Hamlin <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a onclick="return top.js.OpenExtLink(window,event,this)" href="mailto:hamlin.hannibal@gmail.com" target="_blank">hamlin.hannibal@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>

<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="PADDING-LEFT: 1ex; MARGIN: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; BORDER-LEFT: rgb(204,204,204) 1px solid">
<div>&nbsp;</div>
<div>This raises, alas, yet another question -- who should be doing the reviewing.&nbsp; Many young scholars, even graduate students, are eager to review, since this is a relatively easy way of getting publications.&nbsp; But this can easily make enemies and damage career prospects.&nbsp; There is also a problem of authority.&nbsp; I confess I get irritated when I read reviews in TLS or other major journals that are written by graduate students, even when the arguments seem sound.&nbsp; Since a review is partly a guide to books that one hasn&#39;t read, one wants to be able to trust the reviewer.&nbsp; This is not to deny the argument that we all have ideological bias -- not a very interesting one, I think -- but rather to assert the need for credentials and the desire of the reader for a reviewer that can be trusted.</div>

<div>&nbsp;</div>
<div>Hannibal<br><br>&nbsp;</div></blockquote></div><br></span></div><br>_______________________________________________<br>Milton-L mailing list<br><a onclick="return top.js.OpenExtLink(window,event,this)" href="mailto:Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu">Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu</a><br>
Manage your list membership and access list archives at <a onclick="return top.js.OpenExtLink(window,event,this)" href="http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l" target="_blank">http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l</a><br>
<br>Milton-L web site: <a onclick="return top.js.OpenExtLink(window,event,this)" href="http://johnmilton.org/" target="_blank">http://johnmilton.org/</a><br></blockquote></div><br><br clear="all"><br>-- <br>Hannibal Hamlin<br>
Associate Professor of English<br>The Ohio State University<br>Burkhardt Fellow, <br>The Folger Shakespeare Library<br>201 East Capitol Street SE<br>Washington, DC 20003<br><a href="http://hamlin.22@osu.edu/">hamlin.22@osu.edu/</a><br>
<a href="mailto:hamlin.hannibal@gmail.com">hamlin.hannibal@gmail.com</a>