<table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="0" ><tr><td valign="top" style="font: inherit;"><DIV>Not that anyone <EM><STRONG>was</STRONG></EM> speaking of apples . . . not recently, anyway.</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>But we were last summer when I was asking about the forbidden fruit as an apple -- or not an apple -- &nbsp;after one of the scholars on this list pointed out to me that only Satan calls the fruit an apple in <EM>Paradise Lost</EM>.</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>As some will recall, I grew interested in this point and followed up the use of the term "apple" -- and was redirected in a most intriguing way by Robert Appelbaum, who suggested that I think about peaches.</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>I did . . . and eventually wrote a piece that the <EM>Milton and Early Modern English Studies</EM> Vol. 18, No. 2 (2008)&nbsp;has generously accepted for publication despite the speculative nature of my argument.</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>The title is "Forbidden Fruit as Impedimental Peach: A Scholarly ¡Pesher¢ on <EM>Paradise Lost</EM> 9.850-852," but the Korean journal in which this article appears&nbsp;might not be readily available outside of Korea, so if anyone on the list is interested in knowing what I found (or imagined), then contact me offline, and I can send an attached&nbsp;copy of my article (a slightly earlier version than went to publication, for I lack that final copy).<BR></DIV>
<DIV>Some of those who took part in the Milton List&nbsp;discussion of apples turn up in my article (always in glowing terms, of course), which I mention in case this point&nbsp;whets anyone's appetite for more knowledge about Milton's fruit of knowledge.</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>Jeffery Hodges</DIV></td></tr></table>