Many of you may already know about this, but there will also be a week of festivities at Harvard to celebrate Milton&#39;s 400th. See below for details.<br><br>Jason Kerr<br><div id=":xd" class="ArwC7c ckChnd">----------------------------------<br>

<br>
Celebrate the 400th Anniversary of John Milton&#39;s Birth!<br>
<br>
A series of events celebrating the 400th anniversary of Milton&#39;s birth kicks<br>
off<br>
this Saturday, Dec. 6, with a marathon reading of Paradise Lost, and<br>
continues<br>
all through next week. &nbsp;From an experimental theatrical production of<br>
Milton&#39;s<br>
masque &quot;Comus&quot; (Wednesday, Dec. 10) to a &quot;Milton&#39;s Greatest Hits&quot; lunch<br>
(Friday, Dec. 12) to panel discussions and lectures with leading early<br>
modernists, there is a Milton event waiting for you. &nbsp;Come join us as we<br>
remember and toast everyone&#39;s favorite Puritan!<br>
<br>
All events are free and open to the public; everyone welcome!<br>
<br>
Complete info available at <a href="http://isites.harvard.edu/k46682" target="_blank">http://isites.harvard.edu/k46682</a>.<br>
<br>
Questions? &nbsp;<a href="mailto:miltonsdramas@gmail.com">miltonsdramas@gmail.com</a><br>
<br>
Schedule of events:<br>
<br>
Saturday, December 6, 1pm<br>
Marathon reading of Paradise Lost. Hosted by the Harvard Advocate, at their<br>
building at 21 South St. &nbsp;Food served all day. &nbsp;Copies of the poem will be<br>
provided.<br>
<br>
Tuesday, December 9<br>
400th Anniversary of Milton&#39;s birth<br>
<br>
Tuesday, December 9, dawn (7am)<br>
Dramatic reading of &quot;On the Morning of Christ&#39;s Nativity,&quot; on the morning of<br>
Milton&#39;s nativity, on the Weeks Memorial footbridge behind Leverett House.<br>
Breakfast to be served. &nbsp;Copies of the poem will be provided.<br>
<br>
Tuesday, December 9, 6pm<br>
Quentin Skinner will deliver a lecture on &quot;Milton&#39;s Noble Task,&quot; in Emerson<br>
Hall<br>
Room 105.<br>
<br>
Wednesday, December 10, 6:30pm<br>
&quot;Comus,&quot; Milton&#39;s &quot;Masque at Ludlow Castle,&quot; performed by members of the<br>
campus<br>
and area community, and directed by Larry Switzky (doctoral candidate,<br>
Harvard). Barker Center (12 Quincy St.), first floor, near the central<br>
stair.<br>
<br>
Thursday, December 11, 5pm<br>
The English Department&#39;s Renaissance Colloquium<br>
(<a href="http://isites.harvard.edu/k40975" target="_blank">http://isites.harvard.edu/k40975</a>) presents a panel discussion with faculty<br>
from several universities on the state of Milton studies today. Panelists<br>
will<br>
include Dayton Haskin (Boston College), Barbara Lewalski (Harvard), Jennifer<br>
Lewin (Boston University), Thomas Luxon (Dartmouth), Dan Shore (Harvard),<br>
and<br>
Douglas Trevor (University of Michigan). The session will meet in Barker<br>
Center, Room 269.<br>
<br>
Friday, December 12, 12pm<br>
A catered lunchtime reading of Milton&#39;s &quot;greatest hits,&quot; performed by the<br>
faculty and students who love them. Readers will include Amy Boesky (Boston<br>
College), Mary Crane (Boston College), Barbara Lewalski (Harvard), Jennifer<br>
Lewin (Boston University), Thomas Luxon (Dartmouth), Nigel Smith<br>
(Princeton),<br>
Gordon Teskey (Harvard), and Douglas Trevor (University of Michigan). Room<br>
420<br>
at 2 Arrow St.<br>
<br>
Friday, December 12, 4:30pm<br>
Christopher Ricks (Boston University) will deliver a lecture on &quot;Blasphemy<br>
in<br>
Milton&#39;s &#39;Comus.&#39;&quot; Harvard Hall Room 102. Reception to follow at Room 420 on<br>
2<br>
Arrow St.<br>
<br>
Events sponsored by: the English Department, the Committee on Degrees in<br>
History<br>
and Literature, the Renaissance Colloquium, the Drama Colloquium, and the<br>
Provostial Funds Committee for the Office of the Dean for the Arts and<br>
Humanities.<br>
</div><br><br><br>-- <br>The purpose of poetry is to remind us<br>how difficult it is to remain just one person,<br>for our house is open, there are no keys in the doors,<br>and invisible guests come in and out at will.<br>
<br> &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; â€”Czeslaw Milosz, from &quot;Ars Poetica?&quot;<br>