<table cellspacing='0' cellpadding='0' border='0' ><tr><td valign='top' style='font: inherit;'><P>Jim, I think that we're talking past each other, using words in rather different ways, but I'm not sure that you're reading me carefully enough -- or else&nbsp;I'm not being clear enough.</P>
<P>&nbsp;</P>
<P>For instance, I don't think that I've stated that "many common objects are holy," but if I have, then please quote me in context so that I can see what I meant. I would say that common objects can be purified and set apart. They are then considered holy by imitation of the divine -- and they can even become filled with the force of holiness if God so chooses. In a state of holiness, they are no longer called common.</P>
<P>&nbsp;</P>
<P>I think that for Leviticus, the "common" refers to the basic substance of the world. This substance can be imbued by the holy or the impure -- though not both simultaneously. It can also be pure. (The system&nbsp;gets a bit more complex than this, but let's ignore the complexity for the moment.)</P>
<P>&nbsp;</P>
<P>I don't understand this statement:</P>
<P>&nbsp;</P>
<BLOCKQUOTE dir=ltr style="MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px">
<P>What makes the "people" common or holy is not some innate quality, but a purification process by which they are set aside for use by God.</P></BLOCKQUOTE>
<P>&nbsp;</P>
<P>You seem to be using common and holy to mean the same thing, but you must mean something else. As for the following passage, I think that you're attributing some&nbsp;things to me that I haven't stated (though we agree that some things cannot be sanctified):<BR></P>
<BLOCKQUOTE dir=ltr style="MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px">
<P>I agree with you that some objects cannot be made holy in the Levitical system (such as swine), but it is highly&nbsp;problematic to consider these as being ontologically or morally deficient somehow, and even worse to say that they were created by God this way. All common objects, pure&nbsp;or impure, as created are "good."&nbsp;Not all "good" objects are holy.&nbsp;We can say swine are&nbsp;"tainted by impurity" if we understand this to mean ritual impurity, but I don't think we can&nbsp;say they were created by God to be morally impure. I don't think that would be consistent with any theology represented in either the Hebrew scriptures or the New Testament.<BR></P></BLOCKQUOTE>
<P>Concerning your remarks "problematic to consider" and "even worse to say," I don't think these describe what I've been offering in my posts. The Levitical system does not explain how the world came to be tainted by impurity. The impurity is a given and Leviticus provides the rules for dealing with it.</P>
<P>&nbsp;</P>
<P>Impurity, at any rate,&nbsp;is <EM>not</EM> good. It is a dynamic force opposed to the holy.</P>
<P>&nbsp;</P>
<P>One could attempt to argue that impurity is a consequence of the fall, but I don't see that explicit in the Old Testament . . . not do I see it explicit in the New Testament.<BR></P>
<P>Jeffery Hodges</P></td></tr></table>