In traditional theology, there are three conditions that must be met for an action to be a sin:&nbsp; (1) serious matter; (2) sufficient reflection; and (3) full consent of the will.&nbsp; The interdiction makes Eve and Adam&#39;s eating serious matter.&nbsp; The monologues are not themselves sinful, but meet the condition of &quot;sufficient reflection.&quot; <br>
<br>Eve meets all three conditions. Eve knows the act would be serious(IX.652).&nbsp; The first part of her soliloquy is a set of questions of reflection (IX.758-779).&nbsp; Then she acts: &quot;she pluck&#39;t, she ate&quot; (IX.780).&nbsp; Her second sin is to involve Adam, and her soliloquy turns her from tempted to tempter.&nbsp; She introduces a set of non-rhetorical questions (as she wonders whether or not to tell Adam) mixed with one rhetorical question (&quot;for inferior who is free?).&nbsp; She then declares full consent of her will to tempt Adam: &quot;Confirm&#39;d then I resolve,/ Adam shall share with me in bliss or woe&quot; (IX.830-31). When she sees him, she acts.<br>
&nbsp;<br>Adam&#39;s soliloquy indicates similar reflection.&nbsp; He knows Eve has fallen.&nbsp; He considers what he should do, and confirms his decision: &quot;for with thee / Certain my resolution is to die.&quot;&nbsp; Finally, when he eats, he does so very deliberately: &quot;he scrupl&#39;d not to eat / Against his better knowledge, not deceav&#39;d. . .&quot; (IX.998-999).<br>
<br>The soliloquies are not themselves a &quot;sin,&quot; but fulfill a condition that is necessary if the act of eating is to be a sin.&nbsp; <br><br>Sara van den Berg<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Sun, Jun 29, 2008 at 1:40 PM,  &lt;<a href="mailto:jfleming@sfu.ca">jfleming@sfu.ca</a>&gt; wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;"><br>
<br>
On Tue, 24 Jun 2008 15:36:34 -0400 <a href="mailto:milton-l@lists.richmond.edu">milton-l@lists.richmond.edu</a> wrote:<br>
&gt;I wonder if there are other interior monologues by<br>
&gt; unfallen characters in the poem besides Abdiel&#39;s at 6.114.<br>
&gt;<br>
I believe I can answer that. The answer is &quot;none&quot; -- with two exceptions.<br>
Both Adam and Eve have inner (that is to say, mental and non-locutionary)<br>
monologues immediately before they fall. In both cases, moreover, the<br>
monologues appear to be productive of the fatal decisions they take. JD<br>
Fleming<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
Milton-L mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu">Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu</a><br>
Manage your list membership and access list archives at <a href="http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l" target="_blank">http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l</a><br>
</blockquote></div><br>