<table cellspacing='0' cellpadding='0' border='0' ><tr><td valign='top' style='font: inherit;'><P>Jim, could you (or anybody)&nbsp;elaborate a bit on this sort of Neoplatonism? What makes it Neoplatonic? I'm not challenging, by the way, just asking out of ignorance.</P>
<P>&nbsp;</P>
<P>My understanding of the Platonic and Neoplatonic tradition is that it looks upon the body with disdain, spirit and body being&nbsp;fundamentally, dualistically&nbsp;opposed -- the body (<EM>soma</EM>) as tomb (<EM>sema</EM>).</P>
<P>&nbsp;</P>
<P>The point about God transcendentalizing human flesh reminds me of what Raphael tells Adam about the human body as they discourse upon food in <EM>Paradise Lost</EM> 5:496-503<BR></P>
<P>And from these corporal nutriments perhaps<BR>Your bodies may at last turn all to Spirit,<BR>Improv'd by tract of time, and wingd ascend<BR>Ethereal, as wee, or may at choice<BR>Here or in Heav'nly Paradises dwell;<BR>If ye be found obedient, and retain<BR>Unalterably firm his love entire<BR>Whose progenie you are.</P>
<P><BR>(Luxon, Thomas H., ed. <U>The Milton Reading Room</U>, <A href="http://www.dartmouth.edu/~milton/reading_room/pl/book_5/index.shtml">http://www.dartmouth.edu/~milton/reading_room/pl/book_5/index.shtml</A>, June, 2008.)</P>
<P>&nbsp;</P>
<P>&nbsp;</P>
<P>This possibility seems counter to the Neoplatonic tradition to me --&nbsp;though it seems to share the view that the spiritual is higher than the corporeal -- for it accepts an underlying commonality between spirit and body.</P>
<P>&nbsp;</P>
<P>Ultimately, isn't this more consistent with the Jewish element in Christianity that emphasizes the resurrection of the body than the Platonic and Neoplatonic tradition, which disdains the body?</P>
<P>&nbsp;</P>
<P>In other words&nbsp;-- to repeat my initial questions above -- could you elaborate a bit on this sort of Neoplatonism and explain what makes it Neoplatonic?</P>
<P>&nbsp;</P>
<P>Jeffery Hodges</P>
<P><BR>&nbsp;</P>
<P>--- On <B>Tue, 6/24/08, James Rovira <I>&lt;jamesrovira@gmail.com&gt;</I></B> wrote:<BR></P>
<BLOCKQUOTE style="PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: rgb(16,16,255) 2px solid"><PRE>Sounds like basic neoplatonic Christian theology.

Jim R

On Tue, Jun 24, 2008 at 1:14 AM, John Geraghty
&lt;johnegeraghty@hotmail.com&gt; wrote:

&gt; I remember Alexander Gill referencing that God weaving himself into human
&gt; flesh at Christ's Nativity  sanctifies and redeems human flesh to the
point
&gt; it  transcendentalizes it and makes it abhorrent to Satan.
&gt;
&gt; I'd have to look up the reference again, if anyone is interested.
&gt;
&gt;
&gt;
&gt; -John
_______________________________________________
Milton-L mailing list
Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu
Manage your list membership and access list archives at
http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l</PRE></BLOCKQUOTE></td></tr></table>