<html>
<body>
At 06:51 AM 7/27/2006, you wrote:<br>
<blockquote type=cite class=cite cite="">H<br><br>
Now, all this being said, if we accept, just for the sake of
argument,<br>
that all these are Milton's assumptions about God as well, that<br>
doesn't mean that God as a character in the drama of PL doesn't 
come<br>
across as a narrow minded tyrant.&nbsp; But this leads to my next
question:<br>
does Milton's God come across this way because he is poorly 
written,<br>
or because it is very difficult to impossible to well represent God<br>
dramatically, or because of our own philosophical commitments?<br><br>
</blockquote><br>
Jim Rovira's choices repeat a paradigm that is very common in treatments
of Milton's God. Faced with a depiction of God that goes against
expectation, critics either attribute the anomaly to an artistic failing
on Milton's part (&quot;he is poorly written&quot;), or the impossibility
of the task, the assumption being that Milton could not possibly have
<u>meant</u> for God to come across as a narrow-minded tyrant. However,
as I've demonstrated elsewhere, critiques of God were far from uncommon
in the latter seventeenth century (commentaries on the Book of Job, for
instance, rocket during this period), and given the vast amount of
evidence within PL that God is a deeply unsavory character, who is not
only cruel, but mendacious, perhaps we should assume that Milton knew
what he was doing (he did not fail artistically in other parts of the
poem, so why here?), and deal with poem Milton wrote, not the poem we
wish he would have written. <br><br>
Peter C. Herman<br>
</body>
</html>