<!doctype html public "-//W3C//DTD W3 HTML//EN">
<html><head><style type="text/css"><!--
blockquote, dl, ul, ol, li { padding-top: 0 ; padding-bottom: 0 }
 --></style><title>Re: [Milton-L] The irrelevance of Satan's
character</title></head><body>
<div>The interesting question is not Satan's moral character, but
God's.&nbsp; That is the difference between being a Blakean (which I
am not), and being a Shelleyan (which I am).&nbsp; Blake thought Satan
admirable; I think Satan deeply problematic, and agree that he is
proud, ambitious, envious, etc.&nbsp; But Shelley's point is that it
is Milton's great achievement to have made -- despite his conscious
intentions -- his God equally morally problematic.&nbsp; Shelley
thinks that both M's God and his devil are morally repulsive.&nbsp; So
talk about Satan's bad character is irrelevant (and mostly
uninteresting, since it is not these qualities that make Milton's
Satan so memorable, but his eloquence, indomitableness, daring,
etc).</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>And on the question of forgiveness, Satan's character is, again,
irrelevant, if one believes that the deepest notion of forgiveness --
the most distinctively Christian notion -- is that it does not require
merit -- or anything at all -- on the part of the recipient(s) of it.&nbsp;
If one takes that view seriously, the question of why Milton's God
does not forgive Satan becomes totally and only a matter of his God's
character.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>On persons in the period who praised Origen -- aside from Thomas
Browne, who admits to an early attraction to his views (in<i> Religio
Medici</i>)-- see D. W. Walker,<i> The Decline of Hell</i> -- a
wonderful book.&nbsp; And Origen's view on universal salvation was no
more heretical than things that Milton believed-- like
anti-Trinitarianism and mortalism (and matter turning into spirit).&nbsp;
Given Milton's independence of mind, and awareness of neoplatonism,
materialism, etc, there is no historical or inherent reason why he
couldn't have adopted the view.&nbsp; He was not faint of heart, and
had no trouble disagreeing with Luther, Calvin, Bellarmine, etc. when
he felt like it.</div>
</body>
</html>