<HTML><HEAD>
<META charset=US-ASCII http-equiv=Content-Type content="text/html; charset=US-ASCII">
<META content="MSHTML 6.00.2900.2523" name=GENERATOR></HEAD>
<BODY style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff">
<DIV>Jesse,</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>To be honest, the "point taken" was Jim's statement that all he could really do was refer to the tradition Milton may have been following. With all due respect to Jim (whose comments I always enjoy and consider seriously), when somone responds to a discussion with "Well, you would have to ask God to know for sure" I would soon politely back out; if God's direct intervention into the&nbsp;topic is the level of proof needed,&nbsp;my position&nbsp;will probably be a tough sale.&nbsp;However, based on my previous comments, I of course think that this particular&nbsp;issue is more complex within&nbsp;Milton's text&nbsp;and that Milton, as he so often does, follows tradition but allows for a more complex and comprehensive analysis of that tradition, but I&nbsp;thought I would save any&nbsp;additional comments for someone willing to engage in the "speculative." And ulimately the question I posed to Jim was not meant to be&nbsp;biblical/historical in nature, but rather how Milton creates characters that show the possible ambiguities of that tradition.</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>Jacob</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT lang=0 face=Arial size=2 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" PTSIZE="10">Jacob Blevins<BR>Assistant Professor of English<BR>Editor,&nbsp;<I>The McNeese&nbsp;Review</I>&nbsp;<BR>McNeese State University<BR>Lake Charles, LA 70609-2655<BR>337 475-5323<BR>blevinsjake@aol.com</FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>