<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<HTML><HEAD>
<META http-equiv=Content-Type content="text/html; charset=US-ASCII">
<META content="MSHTML 6.00.2800.1400" name=GENERATOR></HEAD>
<BODY id=role_body style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: #000000; FONT-FAMILY: Arial" 
bottomMargin=7 leftMargin=7 topMargin=7 rightMargin=7><FONT id=role_document 
face=Arial color=#000000 size=2>
<DIV>
<DIV>Carol,</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>Sorry, a definite exaggeration,&nbsp;(never comes off quite right in 
email). But I should have known you of all people would not let me get away with 
that. LOL.</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>No, it's not really a "tirade" against anything, but it is a speech that 
claims superiority for biblical models, thus undermining the value of classical 
learning and literature as the premier material for emulation.&nbsp; Ever 
since--boy, since I was an undergraduate I bet--that passage in PR has struck me 
as a crucial point in Milton.&nbsp; The reader, having probably just finished 
the wonderful complexity of Milton's mingling of the classical and Christian in 
PL, gets to&nbsp;Christ, the son of Man himself, arguing that essentially Job is 
a better model than Homer, David a better model than Ovid or Catullus, 
etc.&nbsp; However, as great a work as PR is, it's hard to agree with Jesus 
after PL.&nbsp; The Jesus speech fits in with the theme of pagan supplementation 
we see all the way back in the Nativity Ode and&nbsp;implicitly in 
"Lycidas."&nbsp; </DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>The irony of course is that Jesus' speech shows Milton's own dependence on 
that same knowledge&nbsp;being&nbsp;underplayed--as if all of his other 
classically-modeled work isn't enough.&nbsp; Milton just HAS to think that he is 
doing something better in PR than he did in&nbsp;PL (does any writer venture to 
write something not as good as his previous work?), but as readers the "Jobian" 
epic just never works quite as well.&nbsp; I&nbsp;argue that Milton's work 
centers around this <BR>"problem," and&nbsp;if SA is indeed a later work (a big 
"if," I know), perhaps&nbsp;it represents&nbsp;Milton's final attempt at 
reconciling this classical/Christian issue--let's explicitly model the form on 
classical tragedy but write&nbsp;it without classical allusion, without a 
superficial&nbsp;reliance on classics, and&nbsp;offer a pure Judeo-Christian 
theme set firmly in the structural conventions&nbsp;of&nbsp;a classical genre 
(Johnson's later comments&nbsp;notwithstanding). With that, we're back&nbsp;to 
my&nbsp;original positive statements for and interest in John's dissertation 
material. </DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>Let me also say, that this thread allows me, as a feel my way through my 
prelim. chapters for&nbsp;my project, to seek some input from this listserv, 
whose opinions and expertise I ALWAYS value.&nbsp; And forgive any lack of 
clarity in this message as it's 4:30 in the morning; I can't sleep.</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>Best, Jacob</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>Jacob Blevins</DIV>
<DIV>Assistant Professor of English</DIV>
<DIV>McNeese State University</DIV></DIV></FONT></BODY></HTML>