<html>
<body>
At 10:21 AM 9/6/2004 -0400, you wrote:<br><br>
<blockquote type=cite class=cite cite><font face="arial" size=2>Re: PL
and genre classification and the language of sin -- this does indeed seem
to be a valid way of approaching the epic. I will need to take a closer
look at Satans soliloquy. A major thread running through my thesis could
be stated as follows: the innovative genius of PL owes a great deal to
Miltons ability to transgress established genre conventions while still
retaining the structural components of the 
epic.</font></blockquote><br>
One point to bear in mind is that transgression of established genre
conventions is that treating genre in this way is a hallmark of most of
the early modern literature we consider canonical. See, for example, what
Shakespeare does to comedy in <u>Loves Labors Lost</u> and <u>Measure for
Measure</u>, or what he does to tragedy at the end of <u>King Lear</u>,
especially the folio edition, or what Spenser does to epic conventions in
<u>The Faerie Queene</u>, particularly in Book VI, and what Donne and
Shakespeare both do to Petrarchan lyric conventions in their verse. It
would seem that genre conventions in this period are like bowling pins,
set up only to be knocked down. <br><br>
Peter C. Herman<br><br>
<br><br>
<blockquote type=cite class=cite cite><font face="arial" size=2>&nbsp;I
am particularly interested in the idea that much of PL can be read as a
hymn, and about what that says of Miltons intent.<br>
</font><br>
<font face="arial" size=2>&nbsp;<br>
</font><br>
<font face="arial" size=2>John Wright<br>
</font>_______________________________________________<br>
Milton-L mailing list<br>
Milton-L@lists.richmond.edu<br>
<a href="http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l" eudora="autourl">http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l</a></blockquote></body>
</html>