[Milton-L] being

Joshua Scodel joshscodel at gmail.com
Wed Mar 28 20:02:04 EDT 2018


Thanks, Clay and Michael, for reminding me of Bridges on elision, which I
looked at many years ago.  If anybody knows more recent work that's
relevant, please let me know.  Best, Josh

On Wed, Mar 28, 2018 at 6:44 PM, Gregory Machacek <
Gregory.Machacek at marist.edu> wrote:

> Of the 28 appearances of the word "being" in PL, 14 are at the end of the
> line.  About 9 of the others are b'ing, and about three disyllabic.  I say
> "about" because when I came to the end of my count, it didn't add up to 28,
> so I've missed one somewhere.  But the rough proportions are correct.
>
> The two other "contrary"s in the poem are four syllables.
>
> So I favor, "As b'ing the contrary to his high will."  Of course, wasn't
> Bridges' point that M *counts* it as "b'ing" but pronounced it as
> "being"?  It's been too long.
>
> Be well,
>
>
> Greg Machacek
> Professor of English
> Marist College
>
>
>
> ----- Original message -----
> From: "J. Michael Gillum" <mgillum at ret.unca.edu>
> Sent by: milton-l-bounces at richmond.edu
> To: John Milton Discussion List <milton-l at richmond.edu>
> Cc:
> Subject: Re: [Milton-L] "Millions of spirits for his fault amerced Of
> Heaven."
> Date: Wed, Mar 28, 2018 10:22 AM
>
> I think Clay Greene is right on all counts. The line needs to be a
> hexameter to fulfill the established stanza pattern. Also, "heaven" is
> occasionally disyllabic in PL.
>
> Here's a tricky one: "As being the contrary to his high will" (PL 1.161).
> It has an extra syllable, but should we find the elision in "being" or
> "contrary"? (The former, I'm pretty sure. "Contrary" as noun is apparently
> stressed on the first syllable elsewhere in PL Its third syllable may have
> secondary stress in M's dialect.)
>
> On Wed, Mar 28, 2018 at 9:04 AM, Clay Greene <claypgreene at gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
> Dear Professor Scodel,
>
> I would say Robert Bridges performed the most important study of Milton’s
> elisions in Milton’s Prosody (1923 edition). He is studying PL, but he
> thinks Milton’s elisions are all explainable for syllabic reasons.
> Contraction and elision are for Bridges a core feature of how Milton’s
> prosody works—pretty close to being a systematic study, since he looks at
> all the PL lines that would tilt one way or the other depending on
> contraction.
>
> I can’t speak to the specific possibility of error here, but I think it’s
> probably an alexandrine and that it makes sense to read the word
> disyllabically regardless of the printed version.
>
> My apologies if the above is obvious. Thanks for the chance to revisit
> contraction in Milton.
>
> Best,
> Clay Greene
> PhD Student, English and Renaissance Studies
> Yale University
>
> On Wednesday, March 28, 2018, Joshua Scodel <joshscodel at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> Dear Miltonians,
>
> I have a very dull technical question.  I'm teaching the "Nativity Ode"
> and am bothered yet once more by l. 116 as printed in the 1645 and 1653
> editions:  "With unexpressive notes to Heav'ns new-born Heir."  It'd be a
> perfectly good alexandrine with a disyllabic "Heaven's," but the elision to
> a monosyllabic 'Heav'n's" makes it eleven syllables and the concluding
> three syllables hard to scan.  Is it plausible that this is just a repeated
> printer's error based on the fact that all the other instances of "heaven"
> in the poem are elided to "heav'n"?
>
> Attridge briefly remarks on Milton's use of both contracted and
> uncontracted "heav(e)n" in *Paradise Lost*, but has anybody done a
> systematic study of Miltonic metrical contraction?
>
> Josh Scodel
>
> On Wed, Dec 6, 2017 at 7:18 AM, John Leonard <jleonard at uwo.ca> wrote:
>
> The legal sense "fine" was noted by "P.H." in 1695. He added the
> interesting detail that the word "bears an affinity" with a like-sounding
> Greek word used by Homer, meaning "deprive." The Greek pun then slipped out
> of the editorial canon until Stella Revard rediscovered it in (I think) MQ.
> It is likely that Milton is using both the Greek and the French senses
> (including "at the mercy of").
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
> *From:* milton-l-bounces at richmond.edu <milton-l-bounces at richmond.edu> on
> behalf of Horace Jeffery Hodges <horacejeffery at gmail.com>
> *Sent:* December 6, 2017 7:32:49 AM
> *To:* John Milton Discussion List
> *Subject:* [Milton-L] "Millions of spirits for his fault amerced Of
> Heaven."
>
>
> I had thought that "amerced" meant the withdrawal of mercy, but I happened
> upon some interesting  meanings of amerced [as payment of a fine, and a
> noun form  contrasted with a penalty predetermined by statute]. Probably
> this is all common knowledge among Miltonists, just in case:
>
> In 1365, Henry Galeys, designated guardian for Joan, filed suit against
> Thomas Mott, charging that he "took, carried away, and abducted" (*cepit,
> asportavit, et aduxit*) her with her goods and chattel valued at 20
> pounds "with force and arms" and "against the peace" (*et contra pacem*). The
> jurors found Thomas not guilty because he abducted Joan with her assent,
> but he was amerced because Joan had been taken against the will of Henry.
>
> a·merce  (ə-mûrs′) tr.v. a·merced, a·merc·ing, a·merc·es Law To punish by
> fine or other penalty. [Middle English amercen, from Anglo-Norman amercier,
> from à merci, at the mercy of : à, to (from Latin ad; see ad-) + merci,
> mercy (from Latin mercēs, wages).] a·merce′a·ble adj. a·merce′ment n.
> American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition.
> Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published
> by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
> amercement, amerciament 1. punishment or penalty applied at the discretion
> of a court or other authority, as contrasted with a penalty predetermined
> by statute. 2. the imposing of such a penalty. — amercer, n.
>
> Best Regards
>
> Jeffery Hodges
>
> _______________________________________________
> Milton-L mailing list
> Milton-L at richmond.edu
> Manage your list membership and access list archives at
> https://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l
>
> Milton-L web site: http://johnmilton.org/
>
>
>
>
> --
> Joshua Scodel
> Helen A. Regenstein Professor in English, Comparative Literature, and the
> College
> University of Chicago
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Milton-L mailing list
> Milton-L at richmond.edu
> Manage your list membership and access list archives at
> https://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l
>
> Milton-L web site: http://johnmilton.org/
>
> _______________________________________________
> Milton-L mailing list
> Milton-L at richmond.edu
> Manage your list membership and access list archives at
> https://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l
>
> Milton-L web site: http://johnmilton.org/
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Milton-L mailing list
> Milton-L at richmond.edu
> Manage your list membership and access list archives at
> https://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l
>
> Milton-L web site: http://johnmilton.org/
>



-- 
Joshua Scodel
Helen A. Regenstein Professor in English, Comparative Literature, and the
College
University of Chicago
-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: <http://lists.richmond.edu/pipermail/milton-l/attachments/20180328/50bd889a/attachment.html>


More information about the Milton-L mailing list