[Milton-L] Paris

Kemmer Anderson kanderso at mccallie.org
Mon Nov 16 11:53:48 EST 2015


Paris 2015



Through my eyes the river Seine

Flows under a bridge of sorrows:

Eyelids focused on the night of horrors.



In the wake terror forms: the confluence

Of Achilles’ rage meets Cain’s envy,

And gnaws at the French statue to Liberty.



Blood flows from Troy, the Simios River floods

Rapids of ancient tears across a city

While Homeric hexameters turn to litany.



>From Luxembourg Gardens Athena rises

Standing with her staring gaze: her gray eyes

Calls out to Notre Dame, whose Light never dies.



Kemmer Anderson



On Mon, Nov 16, 2015 at 10:06 AM, David Urban <dvu2 at calvin.edu> wrote:

> Carrol:
>
> I find it offensive and insulting that you have the gall to make such a
> dubious claim with such unmitigated assuredness on such a complicated
> topic, on a discussion list supposedly dedicated to conversation about John
> Milton.  For what it's worth, here is an article by Cornell West on this
> subject, and he nowhere mentions July 4, 1776, although he does quote
> Jefferson's *Notes on Virginia*:
>
> http://www.geraldbivens.com/rd/west-genealogy-of-modern-racism.pdf
>
> Peace,
>
> David
>
> ________________________________________
> From: milton-l-bounces at lists.richmond.edu <
> milton-l-bounces at lists.richmond.edu> on behalf of Carrol Cox <
> cbcox at ilstu.edu>
> Sent: Monday, November 16, 2015 10:35 AM
> To: 'John Milton Discussion List'
> Subject: Re: [Milton-L] Paris
>
> There has always been  chauvinism but modern racism has a rather precise
> starting point: July 4, 1776. It flowed from the spontaneous need to
> explain
> slavery in terms of the statement that "All men are created equal." It took
> a while to really sink in: as late as 1800 a white man was hanged in North
> Carolina for the crime of kidnapping a  free black man and selling him into
> slavery. Forcing Shylock to allow his daughter to marry a Christian would
> ring hollow by the early 19th-c -- it took time to "racialize"
> antisemitism.
> One can also contrast Othello to Emmett Till:.
>
> The same gap occurs in reference to gender. Around 1700 a man wrote to his
> daughter that were it not for the necessary subordination of women she
> would
> be a better writer (e.g., more intelligent?) than he. By the early 19th-c
> gender had been "biologized": Broca wasted a lot of time trying to prove
> that the female brain weighed less than the male brain.
>
> Dario and Richard can debate the role (or non-role) if the Enlightenment in
> all this.
>
> Carrol
>
>  Useful references:
>
> Thomas Laqueur, Making Sex: Body and Gender from the  Greeks to Freud
> Stephanie Coontz, Social Origins of Private Life
> Barbara Jeanne Fields, "Slavery, Race and Ideology in the United   States
> of
> America"
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: milton-l-bounces at lists.richmond.edu
> [mailto:milton-l-bounces at lists.richmond.edu] On Behalf Of Dario Rivarossa
> Sent: Sunday, November 15, 2015 1:59 PM
> To: milton-l at lists.richmond.edu
> Subject: [Milton-L] Paris
>
> >But don't you think racism was also embedded in the Renaissance . . . ?
>
> Sure. But, in its root, it was no dealing with "universal rules of a
> universal nature" (that is Enlightenment insanity), but precisely
> with: "We may be fighting you, but we will respect you _if_ you
> _concretely_
> show you deserve it," e.g. in the field of culture, or in a battlefield.
> Chess play. See Cervantes' own biography, in addition to his masterpiece.
>
> Independently of Islam, one may want to have a look at African servants and
> maids as they appear in 16th paintings, especially those made by Venetian
> masters. They had been bought as slaves, yeah, slaves, in the "Christian"
> city of Venice that was the biggest slave market then. But, as soon as
> those
> black people started to partake in the Venetian civilization, wealth,
> fashion, etc., they BECAME noble, beautiful, etc., precisely as all others.
> Nothing like 19-20th century racist pictures.
>
> Going back to Islam, the poems of chivalry were not weekend pastimes but
> cultural manifestos (they included everything that currently is divided
> among books, essays, plays, movies, exhibitions, . . .). They perfectly
> show
> what society wanted to look like, and the policies to be adopted.
>
> But this will work only with 'Tancreds' on the one side and 'Arganteses' on
> the other side. Both sides sharing VALUES -- of which, blasphemy, conceit,
> as well as the philosophy of "One Civilization, One Culture, One
> Technology,
> One World Bank" are not in the list.
>
> --
> il Tassista http://tassonomia.blogspot.it e http://stornielle.blogspot.it
> co-artist with the Magic Trio http://tiziafra.wix.com/the-magic-trio
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