[Milton-L] Passing this along... -Carl

JCarl Bellinger dionhalic at gmail.com
Fri Jan 3 00:19:44 EST 2014


Thanks, Jim R.!

You wrote:
"...compared to Milton's descriptions. Blake's biggest change is not to the
character of Sin, but to the character of Death, who in Milton is a
formless mass but who in Blake is -- quite deliberately -- given definite
form." So it seems perhaps Mr. Machesek and Mr. Blake occupy th'obverse
sides of the same anti-Miltonic coin: we must either reform the beast into
some decently definite narrative shape or expunge it altogether.
  Cheers to all,  -Carl
On Dec 28, 2013 1:00 PM, "James Rovira" <jamesrovira at gmail.com> wrote:

> Thanks for sharing, Carl. It's a decent enough article with a thoroughly
> annoying headline. As the article observes, Blake's illustrations are, if
> anything, tame compared to Milton's descriptions. Blake's biggest change is
> not to the character of Sin, but to the character of Death, who in Milton
> is a formless mass but who in Blake is -- quite deliberately -- given
> definite form.
>
> . . . The other shape,
> If shape it might be call'd that shape had none
> Distinguishable in member, joynt, or limb,
> Or substance might be call'd that shadow seem'd,
> For each seem'd either; black it stood as Night, [ 670 ]
> Fierce as ten Furies, terrible as Hell,
> And shook a dreadful Dart; what seem'd his head
> The likeness of a Kingly Crown had on.
>
> Blake gives his version of Death a crown and a Dart, but also form. I
> think that he means to define the embodiment of Death for his readers,
> which in the Thomas set (second image on the webpage) is definitely
> Urizenic, so associated with Britain's church/state complex, while in the
> Butts set (first image on the webpage) is beardless. The beardless version
> of Death reminds me of Orc, so may be associated with the forces of
> revolution. Death appears three or four times in Blake's illustrations but
> is only beardless in this one relatively early image.
>
> Jim R
>
>
> On Sat, Dec 28, 2013 at 12:32 PM, JCarl Bellinger <dionhalic at gmail.com>wrote:
>
>>
>> http://www.openculture.com/2013/12/william-blakes-many-hallucinatory-illustrations-of-john-miltons-paradise-lost.html
>>
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>
>
>
> --
> Dr. James Rovira
> Associate Professor of English
> Tiffin University
> http://www.jamesrovira.com
> Blake and Kierkegaard: Creation and Anxiety
> Continuum 2010
> http://jamesrovira.com/blake-and-kierkegaard-creation-and-anxiety/
> Text, Identity, Subjectivity
> http://scalar.usc.edu/works/text-identity-subjectivity/index
>
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