[Milton-L] Milton-L Digest, Vol 87, Issue 2

- askgrace askgrace at starhub.net.sg
Sat Feb 8 08:13:14 EST 2014


Pls update email to bestill.grace at gmail.com as my imail will be
discontinued fr march.  Tks

On Tuesday, February 4, 2014, <milton-l-request at lists.richmond.edu> wrote:

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> Today's Topics:
>
>    1. UnMiltonic (Nancy Charlton)
>    2. Whales and the sea (Nancy Charlton)
>    3. Re: Whales and the sea (Arlene M Stiebel)
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Message: 1
> Date: Mon, 3 Feb 2014 11:17:41 -0800
> From: Nancy Charlton <charltonwordorder1 at gmail.com <javascript:;>>
> To: John Milton Discussion List <milton-l at lists.richmond.edu<javascript:;>
> >
> Subject: [Milton-L] UnMiltonic
> Message-ID: <89D881CA-A4BA-46DF-A9A3-33C056481700 at gmail.com <javascript:;>
> >
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
>
> I just couldn't resist the temptation to call your attention to this
> extraordinarily magnificent poem. And when I was reading it, a trio of
> birds were pecking just outside. No crows, though.
>
> Nancy Charlton
>
> Poetry Daily: Chiaraviglio
> http://poems.com/poem.php?date=16105
> Have the app? Tap Here:
> poem://16105
>
>
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> Sent from my iPhone
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 2
> Date: Mon, 3 Feb 2014 12:10:38 -0800
> From: Nancy Charlton <charltonwordorder1 at gmail.com <javascript:;>>
> To: John Milton Discussion List <milton-l at lists.richmond.edu<javascript:;>
> >
> Subject: [Milton-L] Whales and the sea
> Message-ID: <B0AB42EE-13FC-44EF-A869-304E78C7D443 at gmail.com <javascript:;>
> >
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
>
> I added the following to my previous post, then decided it should be a
> separate topic, which would conveniently let me mention a book which I was
> reading when the nautical thread was going a couple weeks ago.
>
> A few days ago I signed a Facebook petition to free the orcas specially
> caught and shipped to Sochi. I put it on my FB page, with a couplet
> inspired by Blake:
>
> To coop up mighty killer whales,
> Offense beside which all else pales.
>
>  I think Milton admired birds and animals but didn't give them much
> thought, not even the elephant with his "lithe proboscis" or the halcyon
> birds or even the serpent. Much the standard Calvinist view that "dominion"
> per Genesis meant domination and justified cruelty and exploitation rather
> than responsibility and nurture. But possibly the specific mention of the
> great whales that God created was not lost on him.
>
> Now the book: MingMing & the Art of Minimal Ocean Sailing by Roger D.
> Taylor. Taylor is a business manager who makes an ocean voyage for two
> months out of the year in his 21' junk-rigged boat. More than just a log,
> it morphs into prolonged meditations on loneliness vs. independence, and on
> the real nature of what is necessary.
>
> It verges on poetry in many places, and Taylor lets his erudition show
> unobtrusively. He knows his way around the canon of English poetry. In one
> remarkable chapter he describes a calm, not a nice one, "a petty,
> delinquent kind of calm, a window-breaking, car-scratching kind of calm
> ...MingMing is at her noisiest in such a calm."
>
> He invites you to "think of any onomatopoeic words you like and make up a
> few more. Run them together, change the order, add accents, and remember
> this is in2 or 3 part harmony. Years of musical training "had habituated
> me" to finding rhythm and pitch and melody. To compensate for this he tends
> to the mainsail, and sets in in case a breeze comes to move the boat. He
> writes down the music he is hearing, a high treble in six sharps, a mezzo
> in three flats and a natural, a a bass that goes under the piano.
>
> But the whales! To the NW of the Faroe Islands 500 fin whales swim
> alongside, are gone as suddenly as they came, and the same much farther
> south on the return leg. In the Azores the next summer he he sees a rare
> sight: a yellow whale.
>
> The thread here touched upon whaling activity and what Milton may have
> known about it. This book sent me to the dictionary many times for its
> nautical terms, and I found that most of these originated in the 17th
> century and the Dutch language. The Dutch and Scandinavians pioneered in
> whaling in the north seas, with important stations at Spitzbergen and in
> Iceland, latterly in England. So the allusion discussed would have been
> well-known in government and financial circles, and Milton would certainly
> known of it.
>
> All three of Taylor's books are available on Amazon. (I'd look at Powell's
> but they are remodeling and the place is a mess.)
>
> You'd enjoy this book, even to the second or third reading. There is a lot
> here.
>
> Nancy Charlton
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
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> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 3
> Date: Mon, 03 Feb 2014 13:32:05 -0800
> From: Arlene M Stiebel <amstiebel at verizon.net <javascript:;>>
> To: John Milton Discussion List <milton-l at lists.richmond.edu<javascript:;>
> >
> Subject: Re: [Milton-L] Whales and the sea
> Message-ID: <84846121-66A8-4B06-9F9B-ABB357FC5158 at verizon.net<javascript:;>
> >
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
>
> As we mention cetalogy, let us refer to the great Moby which has as
> complete an account of Leviathan as could be found in 1851 (and deals,
> somewhat, with religion and questions of good and evil!).
>
> -- Arlene
>
> On Feb 3, 2014, at 12:10 PM, Nancy Charlton <charltonwordorder1 at gmail.com<javascript:;>>
> wrote:
>
> > I added the following to my previous post, then decided it should be a
> separate topic, which would conveniently let me mention a book which I was
> reading when the nautical thread was going a couple weeks ago.
> >
> > A few days ago I signed a Facebook petition to free the orcas specially
> caught and shipped to Sochi. I put it on my FB page, with a couplet
> inspired by Blake:
> >
> > To coop up mighty killer whales,
> > Offense beside which all else pales.
> >
> >  I think Milton admired birds and animals but didn't give them much
> thought, not even the elephant with his "lithe proboscis" or the halcyon
> birds or even the serpent. Much the standard Calvinist view that "dominion"
> per Genesis meant domination and justified cruelty and exploitation rather
> than responsibility and nurture. But possibly the specific mention of the
> great whales that God created was not lost on him.
> >
> > Now the book: MingMing & the Art of Minimal Ocean Sailing by Roger D.
> Taylor. Taylor is a business manager who makes an ocean voyage for two
> months out of the year in his 21' junk-rigged boat. More than just a log,
> it morphs into prolonged meditations on loneliness vs. independence, and on
> the real nature of what is necessary.
> >
> > It verges on poetry in many places, and Taylor lets his erudition show
> unobtrusively. He knows his way around the canon of English poetry. In one
> remarkable chapter he describes a calm, not a nice one, "a petty,
> delinquent kind of calm, a window-breaking, car-scratching kind of calm
> ...MingMing is at her noisiest in such a calm."
> >
> > He invites you to "think of any onomatopoeic words you like and make up
> a few more. Run them together, change the order, add accents, and remember
> this is in2 or 3 part harmony. Years of musical training "had habituated
> me" to finding rhythm and pitch and melody. To compensate for this he tends
> to the mainsail, and sets in in case a breeze comes to move the boat. He
> writes down the music he is hearing, a high treble in six sharps, a mezzo
> in three flats and a natural, a a bass that goes under the piano.
> >
> > But the whales! To the NW of the Faroe Islands 500 fin whales swim
> alongside, are gone as suddenly as they came, and the same much farther
> south on the return leg. In the Azores the next summer he he sees a rare
> sight: a yellow whale.
> >
> > The thread here touched upon whaling activity and what Milton may have
> known about it. This book sent me to the dictionary many times for its
> nautical terms, and I found that most of these originated in the 17th
> century and the Dutch language. The Dutch and Scandinavians pioneered in
> whaling in the north seas, with important stations at Spitzbergen and in
> Iceland, latterly in England. So the allusion discussed would have been
> well-known in government and financial circles, and Milton would certainly
> known of it.
> >
> > All three of Taylor's books are available on Amazon. (I'd look at
> Powell's but they are remodeling and the place is a mess.)
> >
> > You'd enjoy this book, even to the second or third reading. There is a
> lot here.
> >
> > Nancy Charlton
> >
> >
> > Sent from my iPhone
> > _______________________________________________
> > Milton-L mailing list
> > Milton-L at lists.richmond.edu <javascript:;>
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> http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l
> >
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> End of Milton-L Digest, Vol 87, Issue 2
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