[Milton-L] fallatious/fellatio

Salwa Khoddam skhoddam at cox.net
Tue Apr 15 22:27:01 EDT 2014


Greg,
As usual you opened up a new direction for us to take to study the "fallatious/fellatio" "pun":

I was intrigued by the use of the word "fellatio" so I looked it up in the OED and this what I got as the earliest uses:

1887   L. C. Smithers tr. F. C. Forberg Man. Classical Erotol. iii. 97   With regard to the subject of fellation, we must not pass over in silence the raven, whom our constant authority (Martial xiv. 74) calls a fellator.
1888   tr. Priapeia (index) 232   Fellation.
1897   H. Ellis Stud. Psychol. Sex I. v. 118   Taking the twenty-four inverted men..I find that three..have never had any physical relationship with their own sex... In two or three cases fellatio is the form preferred.

Does that seem right?? Does that mean that in Milton's time the word "fellatio" was not commonly used? 

So, if the source was Martial, wouldn't Milton have thought of "fellare" with a long a and and E sound, as in bet, and "fellatio" with a t sound, rather than a sh sound, i.e. its Latin pronunciation? Also, since he was proficient in Italian, wouldn't he have conceived of the word with a long a, stress on the l sound, another long a and another E sound at the end, i.e., as it is pronounced by a native Italian? (Sorry, I don't have the linguistic symbols in my computer.)
If that's the case, then there could be no pun because these two words would have neither phonetic, phonemic, nor even superficial visual connections. One could pun by force, I suppose.
Salwa



Salwa Khoddam PhD
Professor of English Emerita
Oklahoma City University
Author of *Mythopoeic Narnia:
Memory, Metaphor, and Metamorphoses 
in The Chronicles of Narnia*
skhoddam at cox.net
  ----- Original Message ----- 
  From: Matthew Jordan 
  To: John Milton Discussion List 
  Sent: Tuesday, April 15, 2014 3:44 PM
  Subject: Re: [Milton-L] that fruit


  A last thought regarding carrots: orange carrots are a British innovation - those which were first brought over from the Low Countries were purple...




  On 15 April 2014 21:43, Matthew Jordan <matthewjorda at gmail.com> wrote:

    Please forgive me if this material has already been covered (and for using such a relatively low-grade source); but I half-idly looked up "apple," wondering if, and in what sense, the fruit is "native" to Britain...



    The forbidden fruit in the Garden of Eden
     

    Adam and Eve by Albrecht Dürer (1507), showcasing the apple as a symbol of sin.
    Though the forbidden fruit of Eden in the Book of Genesis is not identified, popular Christian tradition has held that it was an apple that Eve coaxed Adam to share with her.[32] The origin of the popular identification with a fruit unknown in the Middle East in biblical times is found in confusion between the Latin words mālum (an apple) and mălum (an evil), each of which is normally written malum.[33] The tree of the forbidden fruit is called "the tree of the knowledge of good and evil" in Genesis 2:17, and the Latin for "good and evil" is bonum et malum.[34]

    Renaissance painters may also have been influenced by the story of the golden apples in the Garden of Hesperides. As a result, in the story of Adam and Eve, the apple became a symbol for knowledge, immortality, temptation, the fall of man into sin, and sin itself. The larynx in the human throat has been called Adam's apple because of a notion that it was caused by the forbidden fruit remaining in the throat of Adam.[32] The apple as symbol of sexual seduction has been used to imply human sexuality, possibly in an ironic vein




    I then found this on apples in Britain (summary: there's possibly some Neolithic evidence; but really they were introduced by the Romans and first mentioned by King Alfred in 885).




    http://www.englishapplesandpears.co.uk/history_of_apples_in_uk.php




    NB - given how global Britain was from relatively early, I am quite accustomed to discovering the most characteristically British things are imports (eg. carrots; not to mention, of course, potatoes - now intrinsic, due to the British, to much of the cuisine of South-East Asia)...





    Of course, fruit in Blake's time would not have been as standardized in shape as we are accustomed to...




    None of this, of course, invalidates Hannibal's point.




    Best




    Matt






    On 15 April 2014 21:07, Hannibal Hamlin <hamlin.hannibal at gmail.com> wrote:

      Or a mango? Interesting, though, that it clearly is NOT an apple. nor indeed any fruit (that I recognize) native to the British Isles.


      Hannibal







      On Sun, Apr 13, 2014 at 3:54 PM, John Hale <john.hale at otago.ac.nz> wrote:

        A side-light on the fruit-debate might be seeing what illustrators have done with it. Could Blake's be a passion-fruit, aha and oho? 


               
               





        _______________________________________________
        Milton-L mailing list
        Milton-L at lists.richmond.edu
        Manage your list membership and access list archives at http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l

        Milton-L web site: http://johnmilton.org/




      -- 

      Hannibal Hamlin
      Associate Professor of English
      Author of The Bible in Shakespeare, now available through all good bookshops, or direct from Oxford University Press at http://ukcatalogue.oup.com/product/9780199677610.do
      Editor, Reformation
      The Ohio State University
      164 West 17th Ave., 421 Denney Hall
      Columbus, OH 43210-1340
      hamlin.22 at osu.edu/
      hamlin.hannibal at gmail.com

      _______________________________________________
      Milton-L mailing list
      Milton-L at lists.richmond.edu
      Manage your list membership and access list archives at http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l

      Milton-L web site: http://johnmilton.org/







------------------------------------------------------------------------------


  _______________________________________________
  Milton-L mailing list
  Milton-L at lists.richmond.edu
  Manage your list membership and access list archives at http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l

  Milton-L web site: http://johnmilton.org/
-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: <http://lists.richmond.edu/pipermail/milton-l/attachments/20140415/16f49c75/attachment.html>


More information about the Milton-L mailing list