[Milton-L] that fruit

Matthew Jordan matthewjorda at gmail.com
Tue Apr 15 16:44:20 EDT 2014


A last thought regarding carrots: orange carrots are a British innovation -
those which were first brought over from the Low Countries were purple...


On 15 April 2014 21:43, Matthew Jordan <matthewjorda at gmail.com> wrote:

> Please forgive me if this material has already been covered (and for using
> such a relatively low-grade source); but I half-idly looked up "apple,"
> wondering if, and in what sense, the fruit is "native" to Britain...
>
> The forbidden fruit in the Garden of Eden
>  <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Durer_Adam_and_Eve.jpg>
>  <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Durer_Adam_and_Eve.jpg>
> *Adam and Eve <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adam_and_Eve>* by Albrecht
> Dürer <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albrecht_D%C3%BCrer> (1507),
> showcasing the apple as a symbol of sin.
>
> Though the forbidden fruit of Eden<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garden_of_Eden>in the Book
> of Genesis <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Book_of_Genesis> is not
> identified, popular Christian tradition has held that it was an apple that
> Eve <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adam_and_Eve> coaxed Adam<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adam_and_Eve>to share with her.
> [32] <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apple#cite_note-book7-32> The origin
> of the popular identification with a fruit unknown in the Middle East in
> biblical times is found in confusion between the Latin<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latin_language>words
> *mālum* (an apple) and *mălum* (an evil), each of which is normally
> written *malum*.[33] <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apple#cite_note-33>The tree of the forbidden fruit is called "the tree of the knowledge of
> good and evil" in Genesis 2:17<http://tools.wmflabs.org/bibleversefinder/?book=Genesis&verse=2:17&src=ESV>,
> and the Latin for "good and evil" is *bonum et malum*.[34]<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apple#cite_note-34>
>
> Renaissance <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Renaissance> painters may also
> have been influenced by the story of the golden apples<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_apple>in the Garden
> of Hesperides<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hesperides#The_Garden_of_the_Hesperides>.
> As a result, in the story of Adam and Eve, the apple became a symbol for
> knowledge, immortality, temptation, the fall of man into sin, and sin
> itself. The larynx <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Larynx> in the human
> throat has been called Adam's apple<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adam%27s_apple>because of a notion that it was caused by the forbidden fruit remaining in
> the throat of Adam.[32]<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apple#cite_note-book7-32>The apple as symbol of sexual
> seduction <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seduction> has been used to imply
> human sexuality, possibly in an ironic vein
>
>
> I then found this on apples in Britain (summary: there's possibly some
> Neolithic evidence; but really they were introduced by the Romans and first
> mentioned by King Alfred in 885).
>
>
> http://www.englishapplesandpears.co.uk/history_of_apples_in_uk.php
>
>
> NB - given how global Britain was from relatively early, I am quite
> accustomed to discovering the most characteristically British things are
> imports (eg. carrots; not to mention, of course, potatoes - now intrinsic,
> due to the British, to much of the cuisine of South-East Asia)...
>
>
> Of course, fruit in Blake's time would not have been as standardized in
> shape as we are accustomed to...
>
>
> None of this, of course, invalidates Hannibal's point.
>
>
> Best
>
>
> Matt
>
> <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apple#cite_note-book7-32>
>
>
> On 15 April 2014 21:07, Hannibal Hamlin <hamlin.hannibal at gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> Or a mango? Interesting, though, that it clearly is NOT an apple. nor
>> indeed any fruit (that I recognize) native to the British Isles.
>>
>> Hannibal
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On Sun, Apr 13, 2014 at 3:54 PM, John Hale <john.hale at otago.ac.nz> wrote:
>>
>>>  A side-light on the fruit-debate might be seeing what illustrators
>>> have done with it. Could Blake's be a passion-fruit, aha and oho?
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> <https://alumni.otago.ac.nz/page.redir?target=http%3a%2f%2fwww.alumni.otago.ac.nz&srcid=14723&srctid=1&erid=825024&trid=d2d94fae-d7fe-43ea-80d4-5e91cff803ef>
>>>
>>>
>>>
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>>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> Hannibal Hamlin
>> Associate Professor of English
>> Author of *The Bible in Shakespeare*, now available through all good
>> bookshops, or direct from Oxford University Press at
>> http://ukcatalogue.oup.com/product/9780199677610.do
>> Editor, *Reformation*
>> The Ohio State University
>> 164 West 17th Ave., 421 Denney Hall
>> Columbus, OH 43210-1340
>> hamlin.22 at osu.edu/
>> hamlin.hannibal at gmail.com
>>
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>
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