[Milton-L] textbook suggestions? literature of the English civil wars

Jason Kerr aelfric at gmail.com
Wed Oct 9 12:06:14 EDT 2013


I know the thread is a bit old by now, but I'd be sure to include Waller's
uncomfortably twinned poems "A Panegyrick to My Lord Protector" and "To the
King upon His Majesties Happy Return." On the American side, Anne
Bradstreet has a poem about the Civil War in *The Tenth Muse.*
Dryden's *Astraea
Redux* ought to be there, too, at minimum as a sign of the general relief
upon emerging from the chaos of 1659-60, and furthermore as an important
component of the way that the Civil War period was retrospectively framed.

I'm looking forward to seeing many of you at Murfreesboro!

Best,
Jason A. Kerr


On Wed, Oct 2, 2013 at 1:37 PM, Mario A. DiCesare
<dicesare1 at mindspring.com>wrote:

>  Dear Hugh Wilson,
>
> Your kind words take my breath away, as did Hannibal's and those of
> others'.  I am really grateful and humbled.
>
> I have not had either the occasion or the will to get back to scholarship
> since retiring and moving to the Asheville, NC, area, mainly because we
> learned after the first year of our retirement that my wife had a difficult
> brain tumor; the resultant operation was a disaster.  She died last year,
> after almost fourteen years of enduring her troubles.  I wrote a memorial;
> if I can find it, I'll attach it.
>
> But I haven't been altogether inactive.  I teach every term at our
> remarkable College for Seniors at UNC Asheville, part of the imaginative
> and flourishing Center for Creative Retirement (wonderful name -- and I've
> had fun amicably mocking it in a couple of public presentations!).  It has
> been my salvation in many ways. The thousand or so members of the Center
> are very interesting people, and Center members enjoy a broad sense of
> collegiality.  This term, I'm doing Vergil; next term, Dante; and in the
> Spring *Macbeth* and *Othello*.  I feel downright privileged.
>
> My very best regards, Hugh,
>
> Mario
>
>
>
> On 9/30/2013 10:26 AM, Hugh Wilson wrote:
>
>  Dear Professor Di Cesare,****
>
> ** **
>
> I hope you’re not planning to recede from public view****
>
> or discussion any time soon.  As one of the pre-eminent ****
>
> senior scholars, you and your generation articulate the memory, ****
>
> the history, the continuity and sometimes, the collective ****
>
> conscience of the profession.****
>
> ** **
>
> Only fools, soon to be superannuated in their time, willfully ****
>
> neglect the reflections of senior scholars.  Various members of****
>
> the profession have benefited from your encouragement, your****
>
> insight, your healing barbs or your kindly wisdom.****
>
> ** **
>
> Live long and prosper.  Please stay engaged.****
>
> ** **
>
> HFW****
>
> ** **
>
> *From:* milton-l-bounces at lists.richmond.edu [
> mailto:milton-l-bounces at lists.richmond.edu<milton-l-bounces at lists.richmond.edu>]
> *On Behalf Of *Mario A. DiCesare
> *Sent:* Saturday, September 28, 2013 5:12 PM
> *To:* John Milton Discussion List
> *Subject:* Re: [Milton-L] textbook suggestions? literature of the English
> civil wars****
>
> ** **
>
> Dear Hannibal Hanlin,
>
> Many years ago, I corresponded with, and then finally met, a hero of mine,
> a Latin professor who had brilliantly and even seductively edited the
> first, second, and fourth books of Vergil's *Aeneid*, Roland Austin.  My
> wife and I stayed with Roland and his hotblooded Scottish wife in their
> home in the Cotswolds. I recall that once, when we were driving to a pub
> for lunch, Roland said was that he felt very much like a back number.
> Your comment about my anthology of Herbert and the 17c. religious poets
> being "old" made me wonder if, despite my somewhat advanced age (I'm 85) I
> should now consider myself a back number and just recede from public or any
> other view.  I don't quite understand the point about my anthology being
> "old" though the observation that it leaves out women is  justified and
> embarrassing.
>
> In the end, I agree fully that new anthologies should be edited.  The
> publishers' ways of getting them out, making their money, and letting them
> lapse (Norton not one of these) is disheartending, to say the least.
>
> Mario
>
>
> On 9/28/2013 4:58 PM, Hannibal Hamlin wrote: ****
>
> It is interesting, isn't it, the extent to which what we teach, perhaps
> even work on, is shaped by such a contingency as the availability of texts
> and anthologies. I've run into this problem many times. There used to be a
> number of anthologies of pastoral poetry, for instance, including one by
> Frank Kermode. None remain in print. Does that mean there is no longer any
> interest in pastoral? Surely not. I taught a course on the religious lyric
> last spring and again, no decent anthology available. There's the Norton
> George Herbert and 17th c, Religious Poets, but it's old, it leaves out
> Donne and Milton (presumably in order not to overlap with other Nortons),
> as well as many others, including Southwell (not 17th c. of course, though
> constantly available in print), Constable and Alabaster, and women like An
> Collins and "Eliza." Ah well.****
>
>  ****
>
> I'd encourage Brendan and anyone else inclined to edit new anthologies
> that might serve us better.****
>
>  ****
>
> Hannibal****
>
> ** **
>
> On Fri, Sep 27, 2013 at 12:12 PM, Brendan Prawdzik <
> brendanprawdzik at gmail.com> wrote:****
>
> Thank you all for those great suggestions!****
>
>  ****
>
> Sara, those pointers alerted me to texts that would be important to
> include, several of which I had not considered.****
>
>  ****
>
> Lara, I have indeed used the Norton Seventeenth-Century anthology, and
> you're right, it's good teaching text *and* it's affordable.  I will
> likely use it and then add some handouts to include prose and outliers.***
> *
>
>  ****
>
> Michael: thanks for those suggestions.  Donne!  I have not read some of
> these but they seem very much to-the-point.****
>
>
> Just fyi, other texts worthy of inclusion:****
>
>  ****
>
> Much of Herrick's poetry: "Argument of His Book" and "Corinna's Going
> A'Maying" are favorites.  Herbert's "Church Windows" is an excellent idea.
> A few others by Herbert might fit.  Obviously, Milton.  Lovelace.
> Cowley. Marvell! -- take your pick.  Horatian Ode, "First Anniversary,"
> Death of Buckingham, Nymph Complaining!, The Mower poems, even.  Hobbes
> would be great.  Love the James I idea.  Some satirical playlets.
> Parliamentary order closing the playhouses.  Philip's double-death of
> Charles.  Broadsides.  Wither?  Leveller, Digger prose.  Denham's "Cooper's
> Hill" (Appleton?).  D'Avenant *Siege of Rhodes *might be a bit boring but
> would tie some things together.  Carew's *Coelum Britannicum* followed by
> Milton's *Mask*.  Even a glimpse of the 1637 *Book of Common Prayer*paired with a glimpse of the 1645
> *Directory of Publike Worship*.****
>
>  ****
>
> In short, so much to choose from.  I was hoping father fondly that there
> would be a textbook covering much of this material.  But alas, I'll be
> using many handouts (with all the copyright fun re: the modern editions).
> ****
>
>  ****
>
> Maybe we need such a text.  Anyone interested in editing one with me?
>
> Best to all and happy weekend,****
>
>  ****
>
> Brendan****
>
> ** **
>
> On Fri, Sep 27, 2013 at 10:29 AM, Lara Dodds <LDodds at english.msstate.edu>
> wrote:****
>
>
> Have you looked at the Norton Critical editions _Seventeenth-Century
> British Poetry: 1603-1660_ ed. Rumrich and Chaplin. It's accessible,
> affordable, and I've found it to be fairly flexible for teaching 17th-C
> lit. courses on several different themes. It could be combined effectively
> with the prose anthology Sara suggested.****
>
>  ****
>
> Best,****
>
> Lara ****
>
>
>  ****
>
>  ****
>
> Dr. Lara A Dodds
> Associate Professor and Graduate Coordinator
> English Department
> Mississippi State University
>
> Phone: 662-325-2354****
>
>  ****
>
> *The Literary Invention of Margaret Cavendish*****
>
>  ****
>
> http://www.dupress.duq.edu/products/religiousstudies7-cloth****
>
> >>> "J. Michael Gillum" <mgillum at ret.unca.edu> 9/27/2013 9:34 AM >>>****
>
> I don't have a book to suggest, but some political poems to throw in,
> besides the obvious Multon, Marvell, and Lovelace: ****
>
> ** **
>
> -James I, sonnet prefatory to Basilikon Doron****
>
> -Donne, "Show me, dear Christ"****
>
> -Herbert,"The British Church," "The Windows." ****
>
> -Wm. Drummond of Hawthornden, epigram on Pym****
>
> -Herrick, epigrams "Twixt Kings and Subjects," "Twixt Kings and Tyrants,"
> "Preposterous is that government," "Tis liberty to serve one lord"****
>
> ** **
>
> ** **
>
> On Thu, Sep 26, 2013 at 7:29 PM, Sara van den Berg <vandens at slu.edu>
> wrote:****
>
> You might consider including The Grand Quarrel: Women's Memoirs of the
> English Civil War, edited by Roger Hudson. This anthology includes memoirs
> by Lucy Hutchinson, Margaret Cavendish, Anne Halkett, Anne Fanshawe, Alice
> Thornton, and Brilliana Harley. Another possibility would be Her Own Life:
> Autobiographical Writings by 17th-century Englishwomen, edited by Elspeth
> Graham et al. That includes selections by Anna Trapnel, Hannah Allen,
> Quaker women, and others. ****
>
> Sara van den Berg****
>
> ** **
>
> On Thu, Sep 26, 2013 at 2:17 PM, Brendan Prawdzik <
> brendanprawdzik at gmail.com> wrote:****
>
>   Dear all,****
>
> Next semester I'll be co-teaching a course on History and Literature of
> the English Civil War[s]. I've been looking for a literary anthology on
> this particular time period and have not come across anything so narrowly
> focused. (Restoration Lit can be covered, too. I'm looking for mostly
> poetry but also some prose.) I'm wondering if any of you teachers have a
> recommendation. Of course I can patch together a reader but would rather
> work through a textbook.****
>
> Many thanks,****
>
> Brendan****
>
> ** **
>
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>
> -- ****
>
> Hannibal Hamlin
> Associate Professor of English****
>
> Author of *The Bible in Shakespeare*, now available through all good
> bookshops, or direct from Oxford University Press at
> http://ukcatalogue.oup.com/product/9780199677610.do****
>
> Editor, *Reformation*
> The Ohio State University
> 164 West 17th Ave., 421 Denney Hall
> Columbus, OH 43210-1340
> hamlin.22 at osu.edu/
> hamlin.hannibal at gmail.com****
>
>
>
>
> ****
>
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-- 
The purpose of poetry is to remind us
how difficult it is to remain just one person,
for our house is open, there are no keys in the doors,
and invisible guests come in and out at will.

           —Czeslaw Milosz, from "Ars Poetica?"
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