[Milton-L] 1694 Letters of State posted online

John Geraghty johnegeraghty at hotmail.com
Sat Jul 31 20:14:31 EDT 2010


 
I have just digitized and posted Milton's Letters of State at:
http://www.johngeraghty.com/books/thumbnails.php?album=36
 
 
Feel free to copy\distribute for any non-commercial purpose.
 
-John
 
 
Now I shall here begin
For to teach thee A ready WAY
 
I n the SEA without lees
 
S tandeth the bird of Hermes
E ating his wings variable
A nd maketh himself yet full stable
 
A lso a serpent within a well
 
H is tail is long with wings wide
A ll ready to flee by every side
R epair the well fast about
T hat thy serpent pass not out  

A nd Homogenie is my name
 
W hich God made with his own hand
A nd Magnesia is my dame
Y ou shall verily understand.

For my opinion, I think that the manner of the HART's drawing the Serpent out of her den is not, as AElianus and Pliny affirmeth, by sending into the cave a warm breath, which burneth and scorcheth the beast out of her den, but rather, when the HART hath found the Serpent's nest, she draweth the air by secret and violent attraction out from the Serpent, who, to save her life, followeth the air out of her den. As were a vessel is broached or wrecked, the wine followeth the flying air; and as a cupping-glass draweth blood out of a scarified place of the body, so the Serpent is drawn unwillingly to follow her destroyer, and not willingly, as AElianus affirmeth. The Serpent being thus drawn forth, addeth greater force to her poyson, whereupon the proverbial admonition did arise, ' Beware thou meet not with a Serpent drawn out of her hole by the breath of a Hart, for at that time, by reason of her wrath, her poyson is more vehement.' After the self-same manner do the Sea-rams draw the Sea-calves hid in the subterranean rocks, for by smelling they prevent the air that should come into them for refrigeration."
In consequence of this antipathy, travellers were accustomed to wear dresses made of deer-skin, because no serpent would dare to bite any one who wore such armour. The timidity of the Deer was attributed by these strange old authors to the great size of its heart, in which they thought was a bone shaped like a cross.

ANAGRA     MM   A:
NAHTRIHE  CC    UNDE
GAHI          NN    EVERAHTUNIN
ZEHGE        SS    URKLACH
ZU             NN    US

AEIEU  AUEUU 		 	   		  
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