[Milton-L] Re prelaps seasons: when is a question a good one?

Horace Jeffery Hodges jefferyhodges at yahoo.com
Thu Jan 7 18:38:53 EST 2010


Judith, I think that Jim might be conflating two passages:


The Birds thir quire apply; aires, vernal aires,
Breathing the smell of field and grove, attune
The trembling leaves, while Universal Pan
Knit with the Graces and the Hours in dance
Led on th' Eternal Spring. (PL 4.264-268)

 
. . . Rais'd of grassie terf
Thir Table was, and mossie seats had round,
And on her ample Square from side to side
All Autumn pil'd, though Spring and Autumn here
Danc'd hand in hand. (PL 5.391-395)


[Thomas H. Luxon, ed. The Milton Reading Room, January 2009]


The implication is that "There is continuall Spring, and haruest there / Continuall, both meeting at one tyme," but I wouldn't say that "there an explicit reference in PL just to that very thing -- continual Spring and harvest," though the dancing in both passages suggests that Milton was linking the two.



Jeffery Hodges



________________________________
From: Judith H. Anderson <anders at indiana.edu>
To: John Milton Discussion List <milton-l at lists.richmond.edu>
Sent: Fri, January 8, 2010 8:14:56 AM
Subject: RE: [Milton-L] Re prelaps seasons: when is a question a good one?


Jim, I don’t remember one, but perhaps PL XI.899 rings in your ear: “Seed-time and Harvest, Heat and hoary Frost.”  This would be the fallen world, of course, and not my point.  A mythic conception, rather than an exact echo, is what I had in mind.  Thanks for the memory, though.  --Judith
 
From:milton-l-bounces at lists.richmond.edu [mailto:milton-l-bounces at lists.richmond.edu] On Behalf Of James Rovira
Sent: Wednesday, January 06, 2010 7:30 PM
To: John Milton Discussion List
Subject: Re: [Milton-L] Re prelaps seasons: when is a question a good one?
 
Isn't there an explicit reference in PL just to that very thing -- continual Spring and harvest?  
 
Jim R
On Wed, Jan 6, 2010 at 6:55 PM, Judith H. Anderson <anders at indiana.edu> wrote:
I can't resist a two-line postscript in some ways relevant (and in some
irrelevant): "There is continuall Spring, and haruest there / Continuall,
both meeting at one tyme." I mean to invoke only these two lines from the
Garden(s) of Adonis, which, in itself, is neither a static place nor one
without temporal loss.  But these two lines alone momentarily capture what
Milton attempts. The mythic imagination, whether sacred or not, is the
bottom line here?

Judith
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