[Milton-L] CFP RSA 2010: Milton in Italy

Horace Jeffery Hodges jefferyhodges at yahoo.com
Wed Apr 1 06:54:59 EDT 2009


Kim,
 
I'd better leave that to the man who's probably already had the idea.
 
But maybe I could some mileage out of my Pullman thesis...
 
Jeffery (note the spelling)

--- On Tue, 3/31/09, kimberly johnson <kimberly.johnson71 at gmail.com> wrote:


From: kimberly johnson <kimberly.johnson71 at gmail.com>
Subject: Re: [Milton-L] CFP RSA 2010: Milton in Italy
To: "John Milton Discussion List" <milton-l at lists.richmond.edu>
Date: Tuesday, March 31, 2009, 3:21 PM


Jeffrey--

How about instead of deleting it you submit it as an abstract and look toward Venice....?  :)

Kim Johnson




2009/3/31 Horace Jeffery Hodges <jefferyhodges at yahoo.com>






And here I was, expecting a discussion of how the "young castrati in the guise of stripling cherubs" inspired Milton's depiction of Satan's encounter with Uriel.
 
Now, I've got to delete that thought...
 
Jeffery Hodges

--- On Tue, 3/31/09, john rumrich <rumrich at mail.utexas.edu> wrote:


From: john rumrich <rumrich at mail.utexas.edu>
Subject: Re: [Milton-L] CFP RSA 2010: Milton in Italy
To: "John Milton Discussion List" <milton-l at lists.richmond.edu>
Date: Tuesday, March 31, 2009, 2:11 PM





Sorry for the mistaken send of an embryonic message.  I hadn't even gotten rid of the typos yet.  Do me a favor and delete it.

John Rumrich





On Tue, Mar 31, 2009 at 1:58 PM, john rumrich <rumrich at mail.utexas.edu> wrote:

Dear Kimberly

Here is the abstract for a paper I would like to present at the 2010 RSA conference.  I will also attach a short vita below.

John Rumrich



Abstract:

Milton among the Castrati

Clement VIII (1592-1605) was the first to open the Pontifical choir to castrati singers, who by 1625 had replace all of the soprano falsettos in the Sistine Chapel.  Doctrinally, the Church consistently opposed castration, Clement VIII and his successors were fascinated  by the voices of the castrati sopranos, so much so that despite the doctrinal inconsistency Clement VIII ruled that castration could be allowed solely for the glory of God.  Subsequently, young castrati in the guise of stripling cherubs participated in church parades and for more than a century were available for hire to keep vigil and take part in children's funerals (this became a significant source of revenue during times of high infant mortality).  

Scholars have established Milton's preoccupation with music during his stay in Rome, pointing to his large purchases of musical scores, his visit to Cardinal Barberini for an evening of music, and the epigrams to Leonora Baroni, who was the protege of Rospigliosi, an early composer of operas.  In short, it is scarcely credible that Milton could have avoided encountering eunuchs whose sexual maturity had been sacrificed for the sake of their art and God's glory.  Milton naturally bore a resemblance to these young men.  Referred to as the Lady while at Cambridge, he was slow to develop secondary sexual characteristics,  and possessed a remarkably fair complexion.  One never sees the stubble familiar from Shakespeare's frontispieces on Milton's portraits. Milton in his Commonplace Book addresses the Pauline injunction to become a eunuch for God and although he, like the Church, opposed the literal practice, metaphorical castrations occur in his later
 works particularly in connection with the advancement of God's glory. 





On Fri, Feb 20, 2009 at 2:13 PM, kimberly  johnson <kimberly.johnson71 at gmail.com> wrote:
>  
> The Rocky Mountain Medieval and Renaissance Association invites papers for a
> proposed session on Milton and Italy, to be held at the 2010 RSA conference
> in Venice, Italy.
>
> The proposed session aims to explore the political, artistic, and
> epistemological effects of Milton’s 1638-9 travels through Italy. Milton’s
> journey made him the acquaintance of such figures as the Vatican’s
> librarian, the grammarian Benedetto Buonmattei, Venetian scholar and papal
> critic Fra Paolo Sarpi, and Galileo, and exposed the emerging political
> thinker to new modes of civic governance. Barbara Lewalski has noted that
> “[t]he Venice Milton visited was the most tolerant state in Italy,” one
> which had resisted many of the censorious acts of the Inquisition. We invite
> paper abstracts (200 words) on any aspect of Milton’s response to the
> philosophy, literature, culture, or religion of Italy.
>
> Paper proposals (250 word maximum) and a brief c.v. should be sent to
> kimberly.johnson71 at gmail.com, by no later than March 31, 2009. Please label
> e-mail subject as “Milton in Italy.”
>  
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>



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