[Milton-L] Camoes (Online Mickle and Fanshawe)

John Geraghty johnegeraghty at hotmail.com
Fri Nov 30 12:36:09 EST 2007


 

If anyone knows of a Portuguese online version, I'd appreciate hearing about
it.

 

 

The Mickle Translation is in the publick domain hosted on several sites:

http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/lus/lusbk01.htm

 

also at:

http://books.google.com/books?id=Z7EfAAAAMAAJ
<http://books.google.com/books?id=Z7EfAAAAMAAJ&dq=camoens+lusiad&printsec=fr
ontcover&source=web&ots=d-B25D17He&sig=ovCGkx1lfQ4VmS54RP_HYJECFXQ>
&dq=camoens+lusiad&printsec=frontcover&source=web&ots=d-B25D17He&sig=ovCGkx1
lfQ4VmS54RP_HYJECFXQ

 

 

 

The Fanshawe is in electronic form from Chadwyck-Healey (1992).

 

It is accessible at:

http://dev.hil.unb.ca/Texts/EPD/UNB/view-works.cgi?c=fanshawe.1564
<http://dev.hil.unb.ca/Texts/EPD/UNB/view-works.cgi?c=fanshawe.1564&pos=1>
&pos=1

 

"The Lusiad, or, Portugals Historicall Poem: Written In the Portingall
Language By Luis de Camoens; And Now newly put into English by Richard
Fanshaw

City: London

Publisher: Printed for Humphrey Mosely [etc.]

Date: 1655

Description: 224 p.

Preliminaries and introductory matter omitted"

 

 

 

Another translation was done in Spenserian stanzas:

http://books.google.com/books?id=jKFBAAAAIAAJ
<http://books.google.com/books?id=jKFBAAAAIAAJ&dq=camoens+lusiad&printsec=fr
ontcover&source=web&ots=D8mDY3GSwa&sig=HhmWuSngbVp0qsl18QbVl9PpND4>
&dq=camoens+lusiad&printsec=frontcover&source=web&ots=D8mDY3GSwa&sig=HhmWuSn
gbVp0qsl18QbVl9PpND4

 

 

 

Regards,

 

John

 

Prima Syracusio dignata est ludere versu

Nostra, nec erubuit silvas habitare Thalia.

Cum canerem reges et proelia, Cynthius aurem

Vellit et admonuit, pastorem Tityre pinguis

Pascere oportet oves, deductum dicere carmen.

 

T  he Purple of the Land rivall'd the Sea's.

H  ere Lybian stones, there silks (the new disease)

A  nd their perfumed fields, ARABIANS fleece.

L  o other spoils and wounds of injur'd Peace!

I   n woods is sought the Mauritanian beast,

A  nd AFFRICKS farthest Hammon hunted, least

 

 

S   urpass'd and dimm'd by the superior blaze 

O  f GAMA'S mighty deeds, which here bright Truth displays. 

N  or more let History boast her heroes old, 

 

S          acred to vengeance and her lover's power. 

O Sun, couldst thou so foul a crime behold, 

N         OR veil thine head in darkness, as of old

   A sudden night unwonted horror cast 

   O'er that dire banquet, where the sire's repast 

   The son's torn limbs supplied!

 

N  ear his meridian tower the sun rides high. 

O  'er Calicut no more the ev'ning shade 

S   hall spread her peaceful wings, my wrath unstaid ; 

       --- SW: ...at meridian height, the glory and beauty of the day.

 

N  or idle stood the gallant youth; the wing  

O  f rapture lifts them, to the fair they spring; 

S  ome to the copse pursue their lovely prey; 

 

A son of Mars was there, of gen'rous race...

 

S   tars distant, but nigh hand seemed other worlds; 

O  r other worlds they seemed, or happy isles, 

L  ike those Hesperian gardens famed of old, 

 

S  uch wonder seised, though after Heaven seen, 

T  he Spirit malign, but much more envy seised, 

A  t sight of all this world beheld so fair. 

R  ound he surveys (and well might, where he stood 

S  o high above the circling canopy 

 

    Through the calm firmament, (but up or down, 

B  y center, or eccentrick, hard to tell, 

O  r longitude,) where the great luminary 

A  loof the vulgar constellations thick, 

T  hat from his lordly eye keep distance due, 

 

S  oon as the evening shades prevail,   

T  he Moon takes up the wondrous tale;  

A  nd nightly to the listening Earth   

R  epeats the story of her birth:   

    Whilst all the STARS that round her burn,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: milton-l-bounces at lists.richmond.edu
[mailto:milton-l-bounces at lists.richmond.edu] On Behalf Of John T. Shawcross
Sent: Friday, November 30, 2007 9:26 AM
To: John Milton Discussion List
Subject: [Milton-L] Camoes

 

Erick--

 

James Sims has published a number of  things on Milton and Camoes.  

Look at items 3066-3075 in Huckabay's bibliography for 1968-1988.  

Also, you should check out William Mickle's "The Lusiad: or, the  

Discovery of India" (Oxford: 1776)--frequently reprinted; see the  

Introduction, the "Dissertation on the Machinery," and "The  

Dissertation on the Fiction of the Island of Venus" which cites the  

relationship with "Limbo" and of Fanshawe and Camoes (pp. 411-414).  

There is much discussion of Milton and PL, and the translation shows  

influence from Milton as well.

 

John 

    

_______________________________________________

Milton-L mailing list

Milton-L at lists.richmond.edu

Manage your list membership and access list archives at
http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l

-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: http://lists.richmond.edu/pipermail/milton-l/attachments/20071130/8b87bd97/attachment.html


More information about the Milton-L mailing list