[Milton-L] language question

jfleming at sfu.ca jfleming at sfu.ca
Fri Feb 10 16:28:03 EST 2006


I wish I knew! and I am not aware, in any case, if the phrase in question is
technical. J

On Fri, 10 Feb 2006 16:03:02 -0800 (PST) milton-l at lists.richmond.edu wrote:
> James, thanks for reminding me of the broader term,
> "homonymic convergence." Is there a subcategory for
> this sort of convergence when two converging words
> have opposite meanings?
> 
> Jeffery Hodges
> 
> ------------------------------------------------------
> 
> James Dougal Fleming wrote:
> 
> let it be noted that the homonymic explanation below,
> whether or not correct, is diametrically opposed to
> the "primal word" one.
> 
> there is an essay on metaphor (Harold Skulsky,
> "Metaphorese," in Garfield and Kiteley, eds., _Meaning
> and Truth_), in which the author claims that "in" is
> sometimes homonymic. This so that its occurrence in
> the phrase "in the phrase" or "in the mind" (or "in
> the sense," or whatever) will not have to be
> considered  figurative. One wonders whether the
> epistemological commitments involved in such an
> assertion could reliably be sequestered from the
> etymologies that might be offered to support it. 
> 
> in any case, even if words like "cleave" and "let" and
> "doubt" could all be shown to be the result of
> homonymic convergence, the fact would remain that
> language seems strangely comfortable with such
> semiotic identities. 
> 
> thus theidentity-phenomenon would remain the fact to
> be considered. JDF
> 
> On Fri, 10 Feb 2006 13:25:45 -0800 (PST)
> milton-l at lists.richmond.edu 
> wrote:
> > The word "cleave" comes from two different roots.
> See:
> > 
> > http://www.thefreedictionary.com/cleave
> > 
> > http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=cleave
> > 
> > Unfortunately, I can't recall the linguistic term
> for
> > this, but two words have converged in sound, i.e.,
> > "cleave," while retaining opposite meanings.
> > 
> > In Coptic, there's the example of "E2PAI"
> > [transliterated "ehrai"], which means both "up" and
> > "down." Again, two words have converged in sound
> while
> > retaining opposite meanings.
> > 
> > Jeffery Hodges
> 
> > , Ph.D.
> > Assistant Professor of English,
> > Simon Fraser University,
> > (604) 291-4713
> > cell: 778-865-0926
> > 
> > Laissez parler les faits.
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> > 
> 
> 
> University Degrees:
> 
> Ph.D., History, U.C. Berkeley
> (Doctoral Thesis: "Food as Synecdoche in John's Gospel and Gnostic Texts")
> M.A., History of Science, U.C. Berkeley
> B.A., English Language and Literature, Baylor University
> 
> Email Address:
> 
> jefferyhodges at yahoo.com
> 
> Blog:
> 
> http://gypsyscholarship.blogspot.com/
> 
> Office Address:
> 
> Assistant Professor Horace Jeffery Hodges
> Department of English Language and Literature
> Korea University
> 136-701 Anam-dong, Seongbuk-gu
> Seoul
> South Korea
> 
> Home Address:
> 
> Dr. Sun-Ae Hwang and Dr. Horace Jeffery Hodges
> Sehan Apt. 102-2302
> Sinnae-dong 795
> Jungrang-gu
> Seoul 131-770
> South Korea
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James Dougal Fleming, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of English,
Simon Fraser University,
(604) 291-4713
cell: 778-865-0926

Laissez parler les faits.


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