[Milton-L] elusive?

Cristine Soliz csoliz at csoliz.com
Sun Aug 27 14:44:55 EDT 2006


Hi,
This is great -- and I've also associated this, too, with Gallileo and the
science of astronomy that Native Americans had and that was interrupted and
forbidden and punished by the Spanish -- in the Aztec Dialogues, for
example, Carlos Quinto's and the padres switch from knowledge of the heavens
as a daily recording of the planets and stars, and the biblical war in
heaven as the only official version that the Indians were allowed.

Cristine
-- 
Dr. Cristine Soliz
PhD in Comparative Literature
Faculty in English, Diné College
Associate Scholar, Center for World Indigenous Studies
http://csoliz.com
csoliz at csoliz.com


> From: Jamie Morton <jlmorton at usc.edu>
> Reply-To: John Milton Discussion List <milton-l at lists.richmond.edu>
> Date: Sun, 27 Aug 2006 01:27:48 -0700
> To: John Milton Discussion List <milton-l at lists.richmond.edu>
> Subject: Re: [Milton-L] elusive?
> 
> Carl,
> 
> The phrase that has stuck in my mind since my first read-through of
> Paradise Lost (back when I was a lowly college freshman) is "Amaz'd
> night-wanderer."  I always look forward to that line, which is in the
> epic simile that refers to St. Elmo's fire, as Eve is following the
> serpent toward her imminent doom.  It's such a small phrase, but I
> think it gets at what you're looking for (and please feel free to
> correct me if I've misinterpreted).  Quite beyond his undeniable skill
> in formulating such a virtuosic and expansive epic, Milton has a quiet
> way with choosing words like an artist might paint a landscape; there's
> a reserved beauty and majesty in the way he phrases things.
> 
> Another passage that comes to mind is the invocation in Book 3,
> beginning with "Yet not the more / Cease I to wander . . ."
> (III.26-7).  His style there contrasts sharply with the bombastic (if
> beautiful) "Hail holy light" (III.1).  I don't know if Milton can ever
> be called vulnerable, and I suppose his apparent vulnerability in these
> passages was likely quite formulated, but it is in his moments of
> apparent vulnerability, the quiet streams next to Milton's usual
> literary oceans, that are to me, as you say, "richer and brighter."
> 
> -Jamie
> 
> ==============================
>      "From error to error, one discovers the entire truth."
>             - Sigmund Freud
> On Aug 26, 2006, at 5:54 PM, carl bellinger wrote:
> 
>> Thanks to all who responded to my query a few weeks back, "Re: Strier,
>> disguised departures," on possible mystic mis-directions in PL. The
>> references are most helpful!
>> 
>> I would like to ask, quite apart from specific conundrums like "fit
>> audience though few" or "hope no higher," if any of you have wondered
>> at moments whether, for all its bright and symphonic and garrulous
>> surface, Paradise Lost doesn't seem to show glimmerings now and again
>> of --how to call it?--  of brighter and richer (and quieter?) things?
>> If so, are there particular phrases or passages that come to mind?
>> 
>> Carl
>> 
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