[Milton-L] Text message version of PL

Tom Bishop tgb2 at case.edu
Fri Nov 18 09:40:57 EST 2005


R, bt thy gt arnd Lnids 2, sdly 4 hm.

T

On Nov 18, 2005, at 9:10 AM, Kemmer Anderson wrote:

> Not all is lost. When PRI radio reported the story yesterday  
> November 17 at 4:45 , the announcer lead out with a recording of a  
> voice reading the blank verse of John Milton. The echoing sounds of  
> the English pentameter permeated the airways and ear ways of  
> listeners who had not tuned to Air America. The proof is in the  
> sound. Compared to the text message sample of Paradise Lost, the  
> poetry was superior in rhythm and diction. The barbarians may be at  
> the gate, but simple poetics of the words stands firms like  
> Leonidas at Thermopylai. Text message shorthand is a call for  
> public readings beyond the classroom. Kemmer
> At 09:37 PM 11/17/2005, you wrote:
>
>> Brace yourselves
>>
>>
>> ----- Original Message -----
>> From: <mailto:debbierayner at sympatico.ca>Debbie Rayner
>> To: <mailto:jleonard at uwo.ca>John Leonard
>> Sent: Thursday, November 17, 2005 9:03 PM
>> Subject: just4u
>>
>> Hi John
>>
>> Thought you'd enjoy this......
>>
>> Cheers, Debbie
>>
>>
>> You have a text message from Hamlet
>>
>>
>>
>> 18 November 2005
>> []
>>
>>
>> LONDON: Woe un2mnkind! The text message is trying to summarise the  
>> great poet John Milton and a respected academic thinks this may be  
>> a smart new way to teach literature.
>>
>> A company offering mobile phones to students has hired Professor  
>> John Sutherland, professor emeritus of English Literature at  
>> University College London, to offer subscribers text message  
>> summaries and quotes from literary classics.
>>
>> The hope is that messages in the truncated shorthand of mobile  
>> phones will help make great literature more accessible.
>>
>> "We are confident that our version of 'text' books will genuinely  
>> help thousands of students remember key plots and quotes, and  
>> raise up educational standards rather than decrease levels of  
>> literacy," the company, Dot Mobile, said in a press release.
>>
>> Hamlet's "To be or not to be" soliloquy is rendered: "2B? NT2B? 
>> =???". At the end of Romeo and Juliet, "bothLuvrs kill Emselves,"  
>> while Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice concludes when  
>> "Evry1GtsMaryd."
>>
>> "Woe un2mnkind," is part of its summary of Milton's Paradise Lost.  
>> Milton actually wrote "Woe to the inhabitants on Earth."
>>
>> "Dot mobile's unique service amply demonstrates text's ability to  
>> fillet out the important elements in a plot. Take for example the  
>> ending to Jane Eyre – 'MadwyfSetsFyr2Haus'. Was ever a climax  
>> better compressed?" said Sutherland, this year's chairman of the  
>> judges for the Man Booker literature prize.
>>
>> That's "mad wife sets fire to house" in English – the climactic  
>> event in Charlotte Bronte's Romantic classic.
>>
>>
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