[Milton-L] help interpret a line

mdanenichols at joimail.com mdanenichols at joimail.com
Mon Jan 26 16:25:07 EST 2004


 Professor Skulsky's claim, "As a deterrent of course, 
nothing will remove the fear of God, and it would
not serve the Tempter's purpose to argue otherwise," 
seems to overlook the preceeding line to 702: "Not just,
not God; not feared then, nor obeyed."  It appears that
Satan does attempt--successfully--to remove, temporarily, 
the fear of God, because, in the Tempter's fictive world, 
which he is creating for Eve, there is no God.  Hence, 
is "The fear of death" an instance of metonymy, this false
"God" being manifest in his (God's) claim: "ye shall
die" if you eat the fruit of this tree?   

Dane
----- Original Message Follows -----
> 
> (As a deterrent of course,
> nothing will remove the fear of God, and it would not
> serve the Tempter's purpose to argue otherwise.)
> 
> Bradburn ends by paraphrasing the "literal" sense of 702
> as "Your fear of God removes the fear of death." This will
> not do, I continue to think. The grammatical subject of
> "removes" in 702 is "Your fear itself of Death," not "Your
> fear itself of God." It is simply  Pickwickian to claim
> that the LITERAL meaning of the former is the latter. 
> 
> _______________________________________________
> Milton-L mailing list
> Milton-L at lists.richmond.edu
> http://lists.richmond.edu/mailman/listinfo/milton-l


More information about the Milton-L mailing list